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OpenChrome DRM Driver For Open-Source VIA Continues To See Some Activity In 2022

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  • libv
    replied
    Originally posted by sinepgib View Post
    I seem to recall this part was after Kevin Brace took over. At least the mail notifying of that. I may be misremembering tho.
    Yup, i pointed it out then, but the offender was Simmons.

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  • sinepgib
    replied
    Originally posted by libv View Post

    and then replaced the copyright statement with his own.
    I seem to recall this part was after Kevin Brace took over. At least the mail notifying of that. I may be misremembering tho.

    Leave a comment:


  • libv
    replied
    Originally posted by lepetit View Post
    it's a shame too that james simmons is not on this project anymore, i don't know what happened, he was very active though.
    Only briefly. Iirc, only when OLPC was still a thing. And he ripped off a bunch of unichrome code, added kernel formatting and then replaced the copyright statement with his own.

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  • libv
    replied
    Originally posted by sinepgib View Post
    I remember having a VIA GPU and interacting with James Simmons via (no pun intended) the mailing list in his efforts to implement KMS.
    Ah, James Simmons, remover of copyright statements. From where i sit, "his" kms code should not be remembered for much more than that.
    Last edited by libv; 24 February 2022, 09:28 AM.

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  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by Adarion View Post

    Exactly that was the idea. Slow, but also low power and added ASICs where needed for video acceleration and crypto. Small form factor, passively cooled. Neat idea in the days where AMD and intel were giving each other the MHz race with no consideration of power consumption.
    Well. It's still okay to use those things, but indeed, today there are architectures with similar power consumption that run circles around these CPUs. Still, if one has them, why not put them to good use if their processing power is still sufficient for the task?
    I don't think mine is good for anything at all, I can try and dig it out sometime. but I don't think I could do much with it. these things were so terribly slow at the time, im not even sure I could run a UI on mine even at 480p. and I can't think of any headless tasks it would be useful for lol

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  • lepetit
    replied
    I have several hardware with via nano in cpu (64 bits).
    zotac vd01
    samsung nc20
    via epia m900

    I hope he will continue on this project.
    it's a shame too that james simmons is not on this project anymore, i don't know what happened, he was very active though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adarion
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
    I think I still have a via board kicking around somewherem it was slow, even for when it was new.
    Exactly that was the idea. Slow, but also low power and added ASICs where needed for video acceleration and crypto. Small form factor, passively cooled. Neat idea in the days where AMD and intel were giving each other the MHz race with no consideration of power consumption.
    Well. It's still okay to use those things, but indeed, today there are architectures with similar power consumption that run circles around these CPUs. Still, if one has them, why not put them to good use if their processing power is still sufficient for the task?

    Leave a comment:


  • xhustler
    replied
    Takes me back to my first rig. First year BSC Comp Sci, got my paycheck from an internship gig and bought an old monitor, RAM, power supply, an IDE HDD, a Pentium 4 cpu stripped from an old lab PC, a motherboard with a VIA chipset. Had its issues but it helped me wade into Linux From scratch, cross compiling and a bunch of other stuff.

    Hopefully mainlining these drivers will help simplify the journey for a noob who has no access to recent hardware.

    Leave a comment:


  • BingoNightly
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
    I think I still have a via board kicking around somewherem it was slow, even for when it was new.
    I have a C7 Mini-ITX board here from an old NAS build and slow is an apt description.

    Leave a comment:


  • dc740
    replied
    Oh... I owned several VIA, and SiS machines since that was all my family could afford when I was young. I don't really know if all the knowledge I gathered was increased when trying to make them be usable, or they actually set me back years on pointless tasks that would never lead to anything useful, since there was no way to get 3D acceleration. I have the worst memories of them, and I still look back in anger.

    Leave a comment:

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