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GNOME 3.34's Mutter Lowers Output Lag On X11 To Match Wayland Performance

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  • #21
    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post

    There is another one that has its own foundation libraries that common gets forgotten about https://www.enlightenment.org/.
    Not really, I think it is used as foundation for Tizen UI.

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    • #22
      On the topic, I'm not sure what exactly they have fixed. GNOME on Xorg was much more responsive for me, than on Wayland.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by blacknova View Post
        On the topic, I'm not sure what exactly they have fixed. GNOME on Xorg was much more responsive for me, than on Wayland.
        This is also my impression, moving windows in Gnome always felt similarly direct as on Windows to me. This is with radeonsi. Since 3.32, also the annoying occasional stutter is gone. I hope 3.34 will finally provide a comparable experience inside the Wayland session, starting with a proper hardware cursor performance. KWin Wayland is way ahead in this regard.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
          This is also my impression, moving windows in Gnome always felt similarly direct as on Windows to me. This is with radeonsi. Since 3.32, also the annoying occasional stutter is gone. I hope 3.34 will finally provide a comparable experience inside the Wayland session, starting with a proper hardware cursor performance. KWin Wayland is way ahead in this regard.
          Windows when you drag a window actually switches to a software cursor and ties it to where you clicked on the title bar, which is how when dragging windows under Windows it looks like the window is perfectly moving with the cursor.

          You can tell by the little flicker of the cursor when you start dragging a window.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Britoid View Post

            Windows when you drag a window actually switches to a software cursor and ties it to where you clicked on the title bar, which is how when dragging windows under Windows it looks like the window is perfectly moving with the cursor.

            You can tell by the little flicker of the cursor when you start dragging a window.
            I don't really care about HOW, that I care is how it feel. Mutter 3.30 on Wayland have been losing responsiveness and mouse precision under load, that is not the problem under Xorg. We can argue all day about how Mutter is ready for Wayland, but this is actual regression which is known but have not been fixed since forever. And now RedHat pushes Gnome on Wayland as default for RHEL8. I'm not exactly thrilled, since this would push others as well.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Britoid View Post

              Windows when you drag a window actually switches to a software cursor and ties it to where you clicked on the title bar, which is how when dragging windows under Windows it looks like the window is perfectly moving with the cursor.

              You can tell by the little flicker of the cursor when you start dragging a window.
              I'm aware of that, still I don't let it fool myself to notice the increased input latency.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Britoid View Post

                The guy's clearly clever and I'm not sure many people would want to touch code he's more than happy to play around with. I understand the hesitation in accepting his MRs as much as people swear by them, as they tend to have regressions or highlight problems in other areas.
                Am I wrong in thinking that the emphasised part of your sentence really ought to be considered a good thing from an overall quality perspective?

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by ermo View Post

                  Am I wrong in thinking that the emphasised part of your sentence really ought to be considered a good thing from an overall quality perspective?
                  Yes it's a good thing.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by zoomblab View Post
                    AFAIK KDE is the only real alternative that is based on its own foundation libraries - and pretty good IMHO.
                    Also Enlightenment, TDE, theShell, Nitrux (partly - it uses their Maui toolkit on top of KDE for some apps), Deepin, ...
                    Last edited by Vistaus; 05-22-2019, 12:16 PM.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by zoomblab View Post
                      AFAIK KDE is the only real alternative that is based on its own foundation libraries - and pretty good IMHO.
                      And why would that be important? I understand the need for forks or creating similar software when something is bad about the market leader like in the case of windows as example or with KDE back then when gnome was created because Trolltech as evil company released it as proprietary software, you can thank gnome for pushing them to release the source code under a free license btw, but since they released the source code it would been best if one of the 2 would been died or at least 1 would become the clear winner and the other a thing for a small minority.

                      But the reality is even worse than that, not only is as far as google trends at least suggest xfce the clear market leader still (but declining) and of course 50 other DEs out now since canonical backstabbed gnome, or likely at least partially because of it.

                      More choice sounds good and to some degree it is, but choice also comes at a cost, not only are linux beginners confused but you have then 2 or 20 half done desktops that are both worse than they could be if all would concentrate on one side.

                      So your argument that kde is good just because it's a alternative don't fly to well with me having a desktop alternative that is especially incompatible (different foundation) creates more fraction and doubles more work.

                      It sounds to me that at least to some degree you would use / advocate for kde because it's a alternative and not because you think it's the better of the 2, as some sort of principle that you want to always use the underdog or something, which makes not much sense I would arge the other desktops are better because they use the same libraries that makes it possible to have more cooperation.

                      Less fraction is a good thing, not a bad thing.

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