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X.Org Server Gets New Option For Specifying Screen Size On Headless Systems

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  • X.Org Server Gets New Option For Specifying Screen Size On Headless Systems

    Phoronix: X.Org Server Gets New Option For Specifying Screen Size On Headless Systems

    NVIDIA's Andy Ritger has contributed a simple yet long overdue addition to the X.Org Server with the new "NoOutputInitialSize" option...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...putInitialSize

  • #2
    I like Raspberry Pi method better. You connect the monitor, boot, and then dump the EDID to a file with

    tvservice -d /boot/edid.dat

    Then you tell the system to use that EDID at boot instead of trying to read from the monitor, and falling back to a default. In /boot/config.txt:

    hdmi_force_hotplug=1
    hdmi_edid_file=1

    This lets you reboot with the monitor off, then turn the monitor on and have it display as expected.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
      I like Raspberry Pi method better. You connect the monitor, boot, and then dump the EDID to a file with

      tvservice -d /boot/edid.dat

      Then you tell the system to use that EDID at boot instead of trying to read from the monitor, and falling back to a default. In /boot/config.txt:

      hdmi_force_hotplug=1
      hdmi_edid_file=1

      This lets you reboot with the monitor off, then turn the monitor on and have it display as expected.
      Well for the Raspberry Pi, those boot configurations are for the closed-source operating system that manages the device itself, ThreadX. How is that method better though? Wouldn't it be much easier to just specify the expected resolution?

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      • #4
        What use cases?

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        • #5
          My gaming machine is pretty noisy, so I put it on the other side of the room and bought a dummy HDMI adapter for €3,00 on AliExpress. It basicly tells the graphics card that a 4K monitor is connected. I then used my Steam Link to connect to the machine. Works like a charm...
          This setting is very welcome for this use case...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
            I like Raspberry Pi method better. You connect the monitor, boot, and then dump the EDID to a file with

            tvservice -d /boot/edid.dat

            Then you tell the system to use that EDID at boot instead of trying to read from the monitor, and falling back to a default. In /boot/config.txt:

            hdmi_force_hotplug=1
            hdmi_edid_file=1

            This lets you reboot with the monitor off, then turn the monitor on and have it display as expected.
            No offence, but this method is a hardware-specific hack, so if you like it you are a bad person and should feel bad.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by LinAGKar View Post
              What use cases?
              better remote desktop experience to headless systems I guess?

              Comment


              • #8
                Makes 100% sense for NVIDIA to provide headless support as they don't offer any (free) Linux drivers for their hardware.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Chugworth View Post
                  Well for the Raspberry Pi, those boot configurations are for the closed-source operating system that manages the device itself, ThreadX. How is that method better though? Wouldn't it be much easier to just specify the expected resolution?
                  The resolution is only one of the attributes provided by the EDID. This method makes all functionality of the monitor available, even though it's not connected or powered on. It can be easily copied to many devices using the same equipment (e.g., lab, classroom, etc.).

                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extend...ification_Data

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by macemoneta View Post

                    The resolution is only one of the attributes provided by the EDID. This method makes all functionality of the monitor available, even though it's not connected or powered on. It can be easily copied to many devices using the same equipment (e.g., lab, classroom, etc.).

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extend...ification_Data
                    Just out of curiosity, what other EDID data needs to be remembered? The only thing I can think of that might cause an issue is if the desktop gets shifted around on a resolution change. For other things, it seems like auto detect should be fine.

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