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The Linux DRM Projects Are Plotting Their Transition To Gitlab

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  • The Linux DRM Projects Are Plotting Their Transition To Gitlab

    Phoronix: The Linux DRM Projects Are Plotting Their Transition To Gitlab

    With many of the FreeDesktop.org projects having already transitioned from their CGit and hodgepodge of services over to Gitlab, the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) trees appear to be up next...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...RM-Gitlab-Talk

  • #2
    Originally posted by tildearrow
    I have a question...






    If you host something on Google (by using the Compute Engine or Cloud Platform), can Google read your data on the VM and/or network traffic?
    well, they would have to be able to "read" it... at least from the disk to give it to you.

    if you are asking if it goes through any of googles analytic infrastructure - i doubt it would (as that would weird a lot of people out and not host there stuff there)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow
      If you host something on Google (by using the Compute Engine or Cloud Platform), can Google read your data on the VM and/or network traffic?
      Yes. Any data that you are able to get unencrypted (the data, not the channel) from a provider, the provider can read.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow
        I have a question...
        If you host something on Google (by using the Compute Engine or Cloud Platform), can Google read your data on the VM and/or network traffic?
        Not this crap again... You're not giving Google anything extra of value by running on Gitlab rather than alternatives. FFS...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post

          Not this crap again... You're not giving Google anything extra of value by running on Gitlab rather than alternatives. FFS...
          Sorry. I just have so many questions when it's about Google.

          What about IP addresses from cloners/visitors of that instance? Do you realize Google may use that data to further build a profile of you? (and then probably sell it to somebody?)

          Yeah, I know we shouldn't care, but I just don't feel like indirectly telling *everything* about me to a company...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
            Yeah, I know we shouldn't care, but I just don't feel like indirectly telling *everything* about me to a company...
            That's why I use Firefox with an ad-blocking HOSTS file (automatically updated monthly, using a download-and-sanitize cron script of my own design), various about:config tweaks, and extensions like uMatrix, Cookie AutoDelete, Decentraleyes, Random User-Agent, CanvasBlocker, and Link Cleaner.

            (Aside from the obvious reasons, uMatrix allows things like spoofing the Referer header and temporarily allowing reCAPTCHA without also allowing it to read or set cookies on third-party domains. Decentraleyes also has the added benefit of making the web that little bit more responsive, since it services CDN requests from a source that doesn't incur network latency.)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

              That's why I use Firefox with an ad-blocking HOSTS file (automatically updated monthly, using a download-and-sanitize cron script of my own design), various about:config tweaks, and extensions like uMatrix, Cookie AutoDelete, Decentraleyes, Random User-Agent, CanvasBlocker, and Link Cleaner.

              (Aside from the obvious reasons, uMatrix allows things like spoofing the Referer header and temporarily allowing reCAPTCHA without also allowing it to read or set cookies on third-party domains. Decentraleyes also has the added benefit of making the web that little bit more responsive, since it services CDN requests from a source that doesn't incur network latency.)
              Was the APK name already registered?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Serafean View Post
                Yes. Any data that you are able to get unencrypted (the data, not the channel) from a provider, the provider can read.
                In fact, they can also arbitrarily alter the behaviour of the VM and deny any responsibility (~oh, must have been your fault, or a cosmic ray!). Or clone it exactly, for instance so someone could rootkit it and inject in some precise context to impose the real one. No that stealthily, but such capabilities may apply to other VMs present on that server, assuming, for instance, some irresponsibly disclosed meltdown-like vulnerability.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by FastCode View Post

                  Was the APK name already registered?
                  Why would APKs be involved? I'm talking about my glibc/X11 Linux desktops, not smartphones.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

                    Sorry. I just have so many questions when it's about Google.

                    What about IP addresses from cloners/visitors of that instance? Do you realize Google may use that data to further build a profile of you? (and then probably sell it to somebody?)

                    Yeah, I know we shouldn't care, but I just don't feel like indirectly telling *everything* about me to a company...
                    You do realize that if you commit code to a public repository you're giving far far far far far more information than your IP address would give, in fact your IP address is basically pointless at that point as often they'll have your real name, or at the very least an email address to identify you by even without having to own the repository itself right?

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