Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why KDE's KWin Doesn't Integrate Weston/QtCompositor For Wayland Support

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Originally posted by Passso View Post
    KDE has always been very independant, which is both a weakness and a strenght.

    Anyway on the long run they always provide a good and complete environment, if you stick to stable releases.
    independant? The frameworks they are making is usable by any DE you want. They are building sofware that can be used by other project and DE, and these project might even contribute back.

    It's contribution between multiple projects. independant? I say a leader!

    I just feel that the gnome community is going in their bubble, not thinking about other projects.
    Just look at what happened at KdeConnect, they rebuilt everything (the protocol) and they used the excuse "we didn't know other projects existed" and then they continued with their things...

    I really hope thing will change and promote contribution and communication between project, even with GNOME and KDE.
    It would be cool if we still have diversity without doing the same work 2 time.

    Comment


    • #12
      I lost interest in KDE when the semantics web crap was dumped in, and the fact Debian pumps out about 500 little packages for it. GNOME 3.10+ was when I stopped needing even a single KDE app.

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by newwen View Post
        Beause it's better to reinvent the wheel.
        Someone told me about their crazy idea that trucks and sedans need different types of wheels.. would you believe it?

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by gufide View Post
          I just feel that the gnome community is going in their bubble, not thinking about other projects.
          Just look at what happened at KdeConnect.
          I don't think that is particularly relevant since the equivalent is just a toy volunteer project. There are plenty of counter examples where KDE and GNOME have worked together on freedesktop.org standards. We can encourage that without talking down anybody or assume malice.

          Comment


          • #15
            O
            Originally posted by tuke81 View Post
            Well wayland port missed sddm 0.9, but maybe it's ready for next version.
            Well, I'd otherwise be inclined to agree but the Wayland branch appeared untouched for a considerable amount of time. That said, I guess in all fairness it's not really a showstopper as with Fedora you can easily run GDM for Plasma anyway.

            Comment


            • #16
              Martin isn't an idiot. Maybe a little over-ambitious at times, but since so much of KDE is his doing, he has a much stronger idea of how a desktop environment works (and should work) than the average person. To me, as long as wayland works and works well, I'm happy. KDE is already relatively bloated, and we don't need more bloat added by doing quick abstractions like cramming in weston and calling it a day.

              Comment


              • #17
                The Martin's blog post explains the situation pretty well, there is nothing to add at the end.

                About the Wayland WIP on SDDM, the project have seen an acceleration to make it shippable in F21( it was in 0.2 version at the time or such like that), but now the development seems be reduced maybe because that target has been reached...

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by gufide View Post
                  Just look at what happened at KdeConnect, they rebuilt everything (the protocol) and they used the excuse "we didn't know other projects existed" and then they continued with their things...
                  To be honest, KDEConnect's protocol is indeed very poorly designed (I say that as a KDE user and fanboy). It requires you to open a range of TCP ports on the desktop for the KDEConnect daemon, because each connected device talks to a different port. Which is of course a very lame architecture. Web servers are able to serve tens of thousands of clients on a single port (80 or 443), KDEConnect could have done the same.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Pesho View Post
                    To be honest, KDEConnect's protocol is indeed very poorly designed (I say that as a KDE user and fanboy). It requires you to open a range of TCP ports on the desktop for the KDEConnect daemon, because each connected device talks to a different port. Which is of course a very lame architecture. Web servers are able to serve tens of thousands of clients on a single port (80 or 443), KDEConnect could have done the same.
                    While true, thats at least partially negated by the new Bluetooth backend (thank god)

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Pesho View Post
                      To be honest, KDEConnect's protocol is indeed very poorly designed (I say that as a KDE user and fanboy). It requires you to open a range of TCP ports on the desktop for the KDEConnect daemon, because each connected device talks to a different port. Which is of course a very lame architecture. Web servers are able to serve tens of thousands of clients on a single port (80 or 443), KDEConnect could have done the same.
                      What a PITA it is with firewalls, to have to open a range of ports for it. Maybe Albert would consider a network change?

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X