Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 10 Dropping The X.Org Server Except For XWayland

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 10 Dropping The X.Org Server Except For XWayland

    Phoronix: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 10 Dropping The X.Org Server Except For XWayland

    Red Hat has formally confirmed what many were thinking: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 10 will be doing away with X.Org Server support aside from XWayland...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Finally!

    (I'm grabbing my popcorn)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Kjell View Post
      Finally!
      (I'm grabbing my popcorn)
      If there is any time to bring some salt, now is the time. Besides, popcorn really fits the occasion !

      Comment


      • #4



        At least 10 pages please.

        Comment


        • #5
          If you are going to be screen-capturing the RHEL 10 desktop and you need to use a magnifier, you are going to have to worry about the performance of the GNOME Magnifier. You cannot get HSXM (whatever that acronym is) in OBS in Wayland.

          This video is intended for the Linux community and developers that can fix any issues associated with the GNOME Magnifier and possibly Pipewire. Currently running Nobara 36 with GNOME 42 in my AMD Ryz...


          This is my bug report:


          Yevhen Popok‚Äč linked to my issue regarding "severely hit performance" in here:


          There is still a long-standing performance issue with the GNOME Magnifier even for 4 years.
          In the output video of a screencast my mouse cursor (pointer) is never visible. What I tried: Wayland, recording with ctrl+alt+shift+r, video...


          So, if you have a visual disability and you want to use OBS, I would stay away from RHEL 10 even when it gets released on the first half of 2025.

          Comment


          • #6
            Reading two comments above, I don't need to say anything, so, i just want to say hi

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GraysonPeddie View Post
              If you are going to be screen-capturing the RHEL 10 desktop and you need to use a magnifier, you are going to have to worry about the performance of the GNOME Magnifier. You cannot get HSXM (whatever that acronym is) in OBS in Wayland.
              So, if you have a visual disability and you want to use OBS, I would stay away from RHEL 10 even when it gets released on the first half of 2025.
              Nothing is perfect, no one actually claims this. What we claim is the "moving-on" stage to more modern technologies with more emphasis on security. Obviously that directly conflicts with other established systems. But as developers, problems can be solved if people take a look at (which is what the post highlights on), if it takes times who cares.. it just creates more experience and better understanding of things while, we, the end-users just wait and get the goods (or complain because it doesn't work).

              Comment


              • #8
                The corporate speak in this press release is as sneaky and deceitful as always.

                The person who wrote this statement went to great lengths to portray X.org as something that requires a ton of dedication, work and resources which is just utterly untrue.

                X.org has been in pure maintenance mode for over a decade now. It requires nothing more than occasional security patches. That's it. Otherwise it works beautifully.

                This is not X.org's depreciation, this is imposing Wayland on everyone whether they like it or not.



                I still cannot grapple with one thing.

                Linux for years now has been about unification and standardization: systemd, pipewire, /usr merge, NetworkManager, DBUS, devtmpfs, etc. etc. etc.

                Why did someone high up in graphics [development] decide that it would be great to have twenty discrete display servers with various levels of features implementation, bugginess and readiness? What's the point? The amount of maintenance, work, resources, etc. required to develop 20 different display servers trumps what X.org might have needed by an insane margin. Somehow it's totally ... fine.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Can Wayland do tricks by now such as having trackpad support for 2 and 3 finger click (to emulate right and middle click)?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by avis View Post
                    It requires nothing more than occasional security patches:
                    I'm sorry, but this is just nonsense. Even if the design of graphics hardware never changed, the number of Xorg CVEs the graphics team handles is huge, and each is usually high severity and requires a massive amount of validation and testing. The reality is that the X protocol is obsolete and designed for hardware that doesn't exist any more, it does not "work beautifully" by a long shot.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X