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Experimental Wayland Driver For Wine Now Supports Vulkan, Other Features

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  • Experimental Wayland Driver For Wine Now Supports Vulkan, Other Features

    Phoronix: Experimental Wayland Driver For Wine Now Supports Vulkan, Other Features

    Announced at the end of last year was an experimental Wayland driver for Wine providing native Wayland support without relying on X11/XWayland. In the months since that yet-to-be-merged driver has continued supporting more functionality and with the latest update is much more viable...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...ne-Vulkan-More

  • #2
    When this checkbox is ticked, I only wish for Steam to be Wayland native on Linux and all my daily applications has Wayland native support. And that is of course all these already works with XWayland.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sethox View Post
      When this checkbox is ticked, I only wish for Steam to be Wayland native on Linux and all my daily applications has Wayland native support. And that is of course all these already works with XWayland.
      What about all those proprietary games on Steam? Rekon they will decide to port to Wayland?

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      • #4
        This is a very significant milestone. Too bad it took so long, but at least we're there.

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        • #5
          I've been waiting for that and it took a while since the last update. I was afraid he's not moving forward with this due to some technical blockers, but look at that! Having games while dealing with different screen resolutions and scaling factors will improve it by a lot! I'm so glad it's actually happening. We'll probably be at the point that wel'll be jamming Windows games on Wayland, but native one will still need Xwayland due to SDL2 issues. That would be funny and sad at the same time.

          The biggest issue with Xwayland and games to me is that when the scaling is applied on some screen, it cannot use higher resolutions than the virtual screen has, so up to 1080p on 4K display. I'm not sure I get that HiDPI/scale factor part right. Do we have a choice whether we apply the rasterized scaling or what? I wonder if that would be possible to tell the Windows app to scale it up just like on Windows, but I'm not quite sure if it's even possible (probably Windows implementation is too big of a mess to deal with trying to mimic and it would need to happen in Wine's WinAPI implementation causing severe problems).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
            What about all those proprietary games on Steam? Rekon they will decide to port to Wayland?
            As a business perspective, there is no financial reason to port most of the proprietary games to Wayland, it is why Valve has the Proton project in place. Besides Proton makes most native Linux games irrelevant in the long run, and this Wine solution _CAN_ make for a better solution performance wise but only time will tell.

            Vulkan support comes with window management handling (resizing, fullscreen etc), and can be used either directly or to implement Direct3D through either WineD3D or DXVK.

            The Wayland driver now exposes multiple monitors to Wine and supports dynamic addition and removal of monitors. It also supports changing the application-perceived resolution of each monitor (through compositor scaling, see previous update [2]) to implement per-monitor mode changes.
            And it sounds to me that DXVK has an easier (but different way) to inject DXVK (D3D(9/10/11)-to-Vulkan), but that could be my poor understanding or me being too optimistic. Either way, schmidtbag is right:
            Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
            This is a very significant milestone. Too bad it took so long, but at least we're there.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sethox View Post
              As a business perspective, there is no financial reason to port most of the proprietary games to Wayland, it is why Valve has the Proton project in place. Besides Proton makes most native Linux games irrelevant in the long run, and this Wine solution _CAN_ make for a better solution performance wise but only time will tell.
              I don't really know how SDL2 works, but isn't there any way to bring some bridge/mapper/compatibility layer that would let us run games built against older SDL2 libraries to work natively on Wayland? Some time ago I read that there are such attempts to bring SDL1.2 games support on modern distros, but maybe someone with more knowledge could elaborate on that?

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              • #8
                This is great news.
                Wayland is really getting there now.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                  What about all those proprietary games on Steam? Rekon they will decide to port to Wayland?
                  Games that are build to run on Windows are completely unaware of X11 and Wayland.
                  This work will make all Wine apps run on Wayland.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bple2137 View Post

                    I don't really know how SDL2 works, but isn't there any way to bring some bridge/mapper/compatibility layer that would let us run games built against older SDL2 libraries to work natively on Wayland? Some time ago I read that there are such attempts to bring SDL1.2 games support on modern distros, but maybe someone with more knowledge could elaborate on that?
                    Most games thankfully don't statically link SDL2. It doesn't matter what version or configuration of SDL2 they were built against, if your build has Wayland support than it will use that.

                    Unfortunately some do statically link it, despite being told not to, so upstream added a method to override that build with a dynamic one via an environment variable. It's unfortunate that such an ugly hack was necessary but I'm glad it's there. I've used it on several games. Trine: Enchanted Edition is one example.

                    For SDL 1.2, there is sdl12-compat. I've only tried it once but it worked perfectly.

                    A surprising number of Linux games don't use SDL though, such as the many built with Unity.

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