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GNOME X.Org vs. Wayland Performance + Power Usage On Fedora 32 With AMD Renoir Laptop

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  • blacknova
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    Also, why don't they make a simple X11 to Wayland translator (like DXVK for DirectX to Vulkan)?

    That way we wouldn't have to run a whole X.Org in the background and therefore reduce overhead.
    It is more simple to add root-less X running on top of wayland compositor. After all this is the exactly the same thing used by OSX for running X11 applications.
    Implementing some translator is just like implementing the whole X11 and no one is exactly thrilled about it, while root-less X have been around for decades.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Also, why don't they make a simple X11 to Wayland translator (like DXVK for DirectX to Vulkan)?

    That way we wouldn't have to run a whole X.Org in the background and therefore reduce overhead.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
    DanL Read the source It’s mostly about Xwayland and cutting support
    You think that makes me happy? (to lose support for X11 apps that still have not been ported to Wayland)

    It doesn't. :l

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    Originally posted by kravemir View Post

    Well, this ALT+Tab issue, for certain apps-only, you're pointing out, isn't that much of UX drawback,... However, I had to switch from Wayland back to X11, because it didn't support screensharing, which I occasionally very much need for remote work. So, unless screensharing works flawlessly in Wayland, I'm staying with X11.
    The lack of screen sharing is a fact. However, in the same DE under Wayland I can use Alt+Tab without issues. The same people blaming Wayland ignore the fact the problem may lie in Firefox, Mutter etc. This analogy gives them a correct label. They're blaming Wayland for not being drop in replacement. It puts more work on others, so if they are Firefox, Gnome, KDE developers I understand their whining. However, it seems they're not and real KDE, Gnome, Firefox developers are fine with Wayland and they decided to port their projects, so WTF those looser are whining about? The only answer that comes to mind is: Gnome, KDE, Firefox devs. You're too slow and you suck! This is the real message of Vistaus , andyprough , etc.
    Last edited by Volta; 15 June 2020, 02:46 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    Originally posted by andyprough View Post
    I'm the moron? Who's the one who can't figure out how to play Quake correctly after 30 years of trying?
    You're the one who didn't figure out how to use Wayland after 12 years of trying. This is the essence of your logic. What recommendation could you give me? Change number of bots, their level, game mode, perhaps? Will this fix broken X that captures mouse for no reason?

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  • tomas
    replied
    Originally posted by duby229 View Post

    Yeah and it was -designed- for extremely simple use cases like car interfaces or kiosks. It just doesn't have to design scope to fulfill the needs of a desktop operating system.
    And what is it that you believe is missing? And please don't say "network transparency"?
    Someone mentioned "color management" earlier. That is currently proposed as a protocol extension:

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...ager-Calibrate
    https://lists.freedesktop.org/archiv...il/040431.html

    So that is at least one thing that is currently missing. Anything else?

    Leave a comment:


  • Grim85
    replied
    Originally posted by 8r34k0u7_57y13 View Post

    Wayland has 0 good implementations and by design can never have a good implementation

    X11 has 0 good implementations and by design can never had a good implementation.

    Wayland doesn't work today, X11 does. Both are crap but one works now. Hopefully Arcan can fix this mess since Mir is dead.
    No one is stopping your from contributing fixes to relevant git trees

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Volta View Post

    There's nothing to configure moron. It plays nicely under Wayland.
    Well, this ALT+Tab issue, for certain apps-only, you're pointing out, isn't that much of UX drawback,... However, I had to switch from Wayland back to X11, because it didn't support screensharing, which I occasionally very much need for remote work. So, unless screensharing works flawlessly in Wayland, I'm staying with X11.

    Leave a comment:


  • duby229
    replied
    Originally posted by tomas View Post

    That is the right attitude.



    As I said. I think it's dishonest to claim that it has been 12 years. Or even 10. A specification of a protocol being 12 years old has nothing to do with the state of the compositors implementing that specification. The first gnome release with support for wayland was 4 years ago. Also, I realize that replacing something as fundamental as the display system is not going to be done just like that. Perhaps it's because I have programming as a profession myself, but I'm not that surprised that wayland is taking this long time to gradually replace a beast like X11, and also that it's not there yet for all (relevant) use cases. It will be, however. Eventually.
    Saying that it will get there "eventually" is dishonest at best. It simply doesn't have the design scope to be capable of getting there. It wasn't made to be able to get there.

    Leave a comment:


  • duby229
    replied
    Originally posted by tomas View Post
    While technically wayland might be 12 years old, the accompanying compositors are far from that. And that is what matters. Look, wayland has the broad support from the industry. It's used in car infotainment systems, it's used in phones and now it's starting to be used on the Linux desktop. It will even be used on Windows through the means of WSL2 in order to support graphical applications. All of you that state that "wayland is already 12 years old and nowhere to be seen" have the wrong perspective. Replacing something so fundamentally as the display system in an operating system is a gargantuan task that takes a long time. And that time is far from being 12 years yet. More honest would be to start counting from the first release of Gnome that supported wayland.
    Yeah and it was -designed- for extremely simple use cases like car interfaces or kiosks. It just doesn't have to design scope to fulfill the needs of a desktop operating system.

    Leave a comment:

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