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GNOME X.Org vs. Wayland Performance + Power Usage On Fedora 32 With AMD Renoir Laptop

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  • #11
    Originally posted by andyprough View Post
    New development project, that's very funny. It's so old that it's about time that someone started working on a Wayland replacement.
    It's so old Gnome and KDE didn't even fully implemented it yet. Your trolling is even more stupid than investing in X. Feel free to start X12 nvidia blob slave.

    If there's XWayland loaded it doesn't tell much.
    Volta
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Volta; 14 June 2020, 09:17 AM.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by andyprough View Post
      New development project, that's very funny. It's so old that it's about time that someone started working on a Wayland replacement.
      Originally posted by Sethox View Post
      To be perfectly honest, these tests means nothing. Wayland works as a new development project would, since it's a new implementation there are scopes that need to be covered that has not been seen before (fundamentally). I say this because Wayland is relative new compared to X as a whole.
      Let's put this into an example:
      Our solar system is old, compare the solar system with the universe our solar system is new.
      AKA, EVERYTHING is relative besides a new "solution" only helps Wayland as a competitor.


      Originally posted by tomas View Post
      It's not clear to me: is it testing Firefox wayland against Firefox X11 or is it testing the same Firefox X11 on both X and wayland (through Xwayland) ?
      One would assume it's Wayland and X11 in it's native environments, the title of the post kind of hints to it.
      Sethox
      Senior Member
      Last edited by Sethox; 14 June 2020, 09:23 AM.

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      • #13
        So "old", "bad" and "ugly" X11 still produce similar or better result and uses less resources than non of the above Wayland... may be it will be a good idea to scrap Wayland and it's compositors alltogether and implement something more high level than glorifed bitmap mixer? I pretty much certain centralized fonts glyph rendering and cache would do a loads of good for better memory consumption at least.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by blacknova View Post
          So "old", "bad" and "ugly" X11 still produce similar or better result and uses less resources than non of the above Wayland... may be it will be a good idea to scrap Wayland and it's compositors alltogether and implement something more high level than glorifed bitmap mixer? I pretty much certain centralized fonts glyph rendering and cache would do a loads of good for better memory consumption at least.
          Wayland started it's development because X11 was fundamentally and technically flawed, meaning the code was based from another time that has only few and limited ways to make it modern.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Sethox View Post

            Wayland started it's development because X11 was fundamentally and technically flawed, meaning the code was based from another time that has only few and limited ways to make it modern.
            That doesn't mean Wayland is the best possible solution for desktop. Why not OSX or BeOS like application servers or QNX Photon? No seriously, why limit functionality to just event processing and compositing? Why not provided standard rendering framework, which would be integrated into application server, which could server as base level for UI toolkits?

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            • #16
              I see an interesting correlation in behavior to X11 supporters and devoutly religious people.

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              • #17
                What's a bit funny with all of these X11 "fans", is that they treat this like some kind of contest where X11 could somehow "win". When the truth is that X11 will slowly but inevitably be phased out during the coming years by wayland. That's just the way it is. And the reason is that the main development happens on wayland and not X11. Many of the wayland contributors are in fact prior contributors to X11. So right now I would say that xorg X11 is in the same position as XFree86 used to be in. It will still be there and used, but it's importance will slowly but surely diminish until one day when it will be so obscure that only old timers like me will remember it. Right now Fedora uses wayland (gnome) by default and the next Ubuntu LTS (22.04) most certainly will as well. And this transition will just keep happening on more and more distributions over the coming years. Sure, there will always be some obscure distro that refuses to move and that will offer xorg X11 for some time, just like there is devuan for those that don't like systemd, but in the broader picture it will not matter much. And when the major graphical toolkits like gtk and Qt someday drops X11, then that will be the end of it.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Sethox View Post

                  Wayland started it's development because X11 was fundamentally and technically flawed, meaning the code was based from another time that has only few and limited ways to make it modern.
                  So we've been told. Repeatedly. Yet when it comes to the real world Wayland still talks the talk, but won't walk the walk.

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                  • #19
                    I'd like to see a similar test with KWin/Plasma. The issue could be Gnome's implementation. Also, I sometimes see Xorg using GBs of RAM after playing certain games so it could be that XWayland being killed when the game exits frees that memory that would otherwise stay allocated until Xorg, and thus the entire session, is killed.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by ResponseWriter View Post
                      I'd like to see a similar test with KWin/Plasma. The issue could be Gnome's implementation.
                      Yeah, well, that's gonna be a neverending story. Xorg is a server in its own right. Wayland is just a spec that everyone must implement. Obviously implementations will vary in quality and focus.

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