Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wayland's Weston 8.0 Bringing Direct-Display Extension, HDCP On DRM Back-End + More

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
    mulenmar
    Senior Member

  • mulenmar
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post
    several years in the future, when 8K displays are as common as 1080p displays now, 8K will be high quality, and 1080p video may be available without DRM restrictions, but then it won't look so good on those 4K and 8K screens)
    Ugh, what a waste. 4K is ludicrous and pointless as it is, 8K can go straight to hell. It's nothing but a desperate attempt to squeeze more money out of stupid people.

    We had enough spatial resolution for media at 1080p. Drop back to 2160p if you have to, but make true 10-bit and 12-bit color screens at 120FPS feasible and cheap -- and drop the shitty built-in "smart" TV software. (Talking to you, especially, Samsung!) Everyone else does it better in a separate product.

    Make it repairable, as much as that can be said of anything involving an LCD panel. Give me lots of ports on the back, and make them *sturdy* no matter the screen size instead of flexing the damn motherboard every time I swap the DVD changer for the VCR or console.

    Yes, I still use a VCR -- video tapes are cheap sources of movies, a full 1/35th or less of the price of a Bluray disc. So what?! Better than working tech going in the landfill!

    Rant over, I guess, aside from pointing out that the MPAA-fia will NEVER let their precious "intellectual property" go DRM-free. The same fuckers who hated the VCR still run the industry and ideas, and they want every penny no matter how obsolete the format.

    Leave a comment:

  • Guest
    Guest

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by aksdb View Post

    They don't have to. If Chrome and Firefox implement the necessary DRM levels, it will just work.
    Um no, you're delusional. That's not how it works. If we have control over the kernel, regardless of the use of a TEE, the decrypted and/or decoded video will be accessible by the kernel, and thus it can be pirated. The only way to prevent the user from being able to pirate it, is if the user has no control over their OS.

    The past and the present have demonstrated that media distributors and publishers are paranoid schizophrenics who think copyrighted movies and TV shows are as important to protect as classified military and government secrets - they'll never play high quality video on systems where the user can control the OS running on the device.

    (and remember the definition of high quality changes over time - several years in the future, when 8K displays are as common as 1080p displays now, 8K will be high quality, and 1080p video may be available without DRM restrictions, but then it won't look so good on those 4K and 8K screens)

    Leave a comment:

  • aksdb
    Phoronix Member

  • aksdb
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post

    Except they'll never allow that. If you think this will lead to Netflix, Disney, Prime Video etc. streaming full HD or 4K video on a typical Linux distro, you are very naive. This work is only for consumer devices that run Linux (e.g Chromebooks, Android TV boxes, Roku etc.).
    They don't have to. If Chrome and Firefox implement the necessary DRM levels, it will just work.

    Leave a comment:

  • Guest
    Guest

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by aksdb View Post

    Although he is morally right, he is still practically wrong. As a user I want to be able to watch Full HD or even 4K content on Linux streaming from Netflix, Amazon, Disney, whatever. Yes, DRM is pointless. They can make illegal copies as hard as they want, but a single person/group copying a movie/episode puts it online and it gets replicated infinitely. So even a 0,00001% chance of breaking it is still enough to break it completely. It's basically like a virus where a single pathogen is enough to infect you. DRM and all efforts around it are a waste of money from the publishers. Yet they still insist on doing it. They insisted on showing anti-piracy commercials in front of DVDs and BluRays. WTF? I obviously bought it. You don't have to convince me. If I didn't buy it, I would be holding only the main video content and would not be bothered by this stupid commercial. What an irony. Yet they keep doing it with every medium.

    So sure, DRM is a waste on the corporate's part. But as a user, I have to live with their (stupid) decision. They don't care about Linux, so as long as Linux makes it hard for them, I - as a user - am on the losing side, no matter how high my moral ground is.
    Except they'll never allow that. If you think this will lead to Netflix, Disney, Prime Video etc. streaming full HD or 4K video on a typical Linux distro, you are very naive. This work is only for consumer devices that run Linux (e.g Chromebooks, Android TV boxes, Roku etc.).

    Leave a comment:

  • aksdb
    Phoronix Member

  • aksdb
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post

    Losing depends from the points of view. If you really need to consume the corporate produce like that you probably shouldn't be using Linux either.
    Linux is about freedom and choice. I want to have the choice between free and proprietary solutions. I am fine paying for entertainment and using closed source applicatons (and games). Do I prefer open source? Sure. Am I a zealot about it? Nope.

    Leave a comment:

  • starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by aksdb View Post
    So sure, DRM is a waste on the corporate's part. But as a user, I have to live with their (stupid) decision. They don't care about Linux, so as long as Linux makes it hard for them, I - as a user - am on the losing side, no matter how high my moral ground is.
    Losing depends from the points of view. If you really need to consume the corporate produce like that you probably shouldn't be using Linux either.

    Leave a comment:

  • starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post
    I disagree about anything with the article, media producers just want to protect their works and I don't see anything wrong with that! Yes, there are ways to get around them, but it's not a reason not to use it ... thieves enter the house even if the door is locked, but not for this reason we leave the doors open!
    The issue with most DRM is that to protect their stuff you are giving them the keys to open your door.

    DRM literally works by implanting hardware backdoors in your system, that process the "secure" content. The issue is that this hardware support can then be used by whatever, malware, governments, and whatnot.

    For years the internet has been nobody's land, where everyone feels entitled to have everything without paying, but life doesn't work like that, everything has a cost.
    This is very true, but DRM is ineffective at best. I really don't feel like sacrificing some of my own liberty for something that sucks at its intended purpose.

    Leave a comment:

  • Britoid
    Senior Member

  • Britoid
    replied
    Yes DRM sucks.

    But people want DRM-protected content, if you don't like it don't pay for it. Your money is more powerful than what you say in this context.

    Leave a comment:

  • bachchain
    Senior Member

  • bachchain
    replied
    Originally posted by mulenmar View Post
    I'm severely disappointed they decided to engage in this bootlicking.
    If you don't like it, then don't use it. The fact of the matter is that there are several things that many people want that also require DRM, and the only thing that demanding that software lack this functionality does is inconvenience them. And before you say something along the lines of "it's to send a message", that only works for platforms with double-digit market-share.

    Leave a comment:

  • mulenmar
    Senior Member

  • mulenmar
    replied
    I'm severely disappointed they decided to engage in this bootlicking.

    Then again, in a world where even the Mozilla Foundation is pro-DRM (actions speak thrity decibels louder than words, guys), I suppose I shouldn't be the slightest bit surprised.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X