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Wayland's Weston Lands A Pipewire Plug-In As New Remote Desktop Streaming Option

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  • Wayland's Weston Lands A Pipewire Plug-In As New Remote Desktop Streaming Option

    Phoronix: Wayland's Weston Lands A Pipewire Plug-In As New Remote Desktop Streaming Option

    Wayland's Weston compositor for the past year has provided a remoting plug-in for virtual output streaming that was built atop RTP/GStreamer. Now though a new plug-in has landed in the Weston code-base making use of Red Hat's promising PipeWire project...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...pewire-Plug-In

  • #2
    Awesome.
    Wayland is technologically superior to x11 in almost every way. Now we just need all the toolkits and the desktops to implement these last few things, and the Linux desktop is ready for the future.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pracedru View Post
      Awesome.
      Wayland is technologically superior to x11 in almost every way. Now we just need all the toolkits and the desktops to implement these last few things, and the Linux desktop is ready for the future.
      The future of 10 years ago !

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      • #4
        I like the connection with xdg-portal a lot. That way it should be possible to ship even apps like teamviewer in a flatpack with propper permission restrictions. Screencast on gnome-shell is still a bit slow and sometimes buggy (ghost cursor), but with some more work (and hopefully vaapi integration so we have hardware video encoding), things should become very fluent.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pracedru View Post
          Awesome.
          Wayland is technologically superior to x11 in almost every way. Now we just need all the toolkits and the desktops to implement these last few things, and the Linux desktop is ready for the future.
          In what way Wayland is superior to x11 (or Xorg)? I don't think it is superior.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by frank007 View Post
            In what way Wayland is superior to x11 (or Xorg)? I don't think it is superior.
            Many things which are either impossible or extremely complex with X11 are trivial with Wayland, and all the basic stuff works better for 99% of use cases. For some marginal use cases, Wayland may be missing a thing here or there, but otherwise it's not even really up for debate.

            On graphics hardware and/or applications from the last decade and a half or so, it's even more power efficient than X11; and for the vast majority of Xorg users (who use compositing), wayland compositors tend to have lower overall latency AFAICT.

            The overwhelming majority of people who use X11 are also using a compositing window manager, and Wayland is built from the ground up as a protocol for compositing window managers.
            Last edited by microcode; 07-19-2019, 07:49 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by frank007 View Post

              In what way Wayland is superior to x11 (or Xorg)? I don't think it is superior.
              beside being feature superior as user microcode already answered, X11 is a nightmare concerning security

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              • #8
                Originally posted by frank007 View Post

                In what way Wayland is superior to x11 (or Xorg)? I don't think it is superior.
                X's design is very old and has constantly been hacked on over the years, where even things like compositing is a "hack". Windows and macOS both had shifts to Wayland-like display servers years ago and Linux has been lagging in that regard. Android doesn't even use X.

                Wayland is a clean break that's tries to to be relatively simple (X has font, print etc systems which are completely redundant). It's more Unix like imho in that it tries to do one thing and one thing well. It's works closer with the kernel to control device hardware (which enables things like flicker-free boot), has a faster compositing design than how it's done in X, is far more secure, makes mixed hidpi and fractional scaling much easier and in theory makes things like hybrid graphics cleaner rather than having to rely on hacks like Bumblebee.
                Last edited by Britoid; 07-19-2019, 08:39 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ALRBP View Post

                  The future of 10 years ago !
                  Writing something that complicated is never fast. Even if someone tried to rewrite X from the ground up it would take this long too, or longer since X has more legacy features to support.

                  Granted, people promising that Wayland would replace X by 2015 or whatever were wildly wrong. Maybe I was even one of the stupid ones, I don't remember.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by microcode View Post

                    ; and for the vast majority of Xorg users (who use compositing), wayland compositors tend to have lower overall latency AFAICT.

                    The overwhelming majority of people who use X11 are also using a compositing window manager, and Wayland is built from the ground up as a protocol for compositing window managers.

                    I do not think XDMCP use is marginality for education based GNU/Linux use case.

                    But use of XDM is not practical amd gdm,kdm and lightdm use compositor

                    so it is not able to run them using xdmcp lohin vi LAN

                    Wayland seems to be same at least for year of 2014. Maybe this is right solution for relacing X-terminals with Wayland or Pipewire terminals

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