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The Greenfield Wayland Compositor Can Now Run Apps Directly In Your Web Browser

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  • The Greenfield Wayland Compositor Can Now Run Apps Directly In Your Web Browser

    Phoronix: The Greenfield Wayland Compositor Can Now Run Apps Directly In Your Web Browser

    Greenfield is the nearly two year old effort providing an in-browser, HTML5 Wayland compositor. This open-source project has allowed for remote Wayland applications to run in browsers while running from remote hosts. Greenfield though can now run applications directly inside a user's web browser via Web Worker threads...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...n-Apps-Browser

  • #2
    Typo:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Among other hinderances,

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    • #3
      question: what would be the better option of this or GTKs broadway backend? Like which would perform better or be easier to set up?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SpyroRyder View Post
        question: what would be the better option of this or GTKs broadway backend? Like which would perform better or be easier to set up?
        I haven't touched this wayland-in-a-browser thing yet, so I can't comment on how it performs or how easy it is to set up ( though it's clearly just a proof-of-concept at this point ). I've used broadway quite a bit now. One thing I can say for it - it's fast. Running gtk apps in an RDP session ( ie using xrdp ) is the next fastest, followed by VNC, followed ( in the far distance ) by remote-X. As for ease of setting things up - broadway isn't exactly a turn-key solution quite yet. I've hacked together an authentication layer and a transparent proxy ( broadwayd claims a port, so there's usually a 1:1 mapping of ports to clients ). With this code, you can hit the login service, which will spawn broadway plus your configured app, then proxy your session for you. It's still a little configuration, but the end result is pretty cool - and very handy if you're working with a client that wants to lock things down ( eg refuses to install X libraries or allow X tunneling, which unfortunately is pretty standard ). I'm planning on doing an open-source release of this, once we get all the config done nicely ( some things are hard-coded for our particular requirements ).

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        • #5
          This makes me very optimistic, I hope this takes off. Way back in the late 90s Microsoft knew the web was the future when the embedded Internet Explorer into their window manager, and now Electron is taking the world by storm. Even before Electron, I knew the future of desktop interfaces was going to be the web. Soon enough, I bet we'll all be using our favorite desktop applications in dedicated Firefox tabs, or something or other. Don't get me wrong, I hate ChromeOS and there are way better ways to handle this sort of thing, "forcing" a web experiencing on someone is an awful thing. But it can also be a wonderful thing when the developer only has to worry about writing a simple web interface and supplying both a rich desktop experience and a fully-featured web experienced all in the same package, on the same platform, for any OS, with any resolution. This is something everyone, especially Microsoft (although they are endearingly incompetent at it) wants to achieve.

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          • #6
            I wonder why it was called Greenfield, rather than Watertown.

            Anyway, seems cool. I'm not sure how widely-used this will be, though.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
              I wonder why it was called Greenfield, rather than Watertown.

              Anyway, seems cool. I'm not sure how widely-used this will be, though.
              Lemme guess: 'Greenfield' in your native language is an offensive word? (sorry if I'm wrong, it's just that usually when people in our community complain about names, it's because it's offensive in their native language).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
                Lemme guess: 'Greenfield' in your native language is an offensive word? (sorry if I'm wrong, it's just that usually when people in our community complain about names, it's because it's offensive in their native language).
                lol no? Wayland, Weston, and Waltham are all related projects, and they all towns in Massachusetts, each of which is immediately east of the other. The next one in line is Watertown, which is east of Waltham. Better yet, they're all names that start with W, so to me, Watertown is the next logical choice:
                https://www.google.com/maps/place/Wa...!4d-71.1828321
                Greenfield is another town in Massachusetts but it's completely separate from the others, so it doesn't really make sense why that was chosen.

                So no, nothing offensive, just confusing.
                Last edited by schmidtbag; 03-20-2019, 01:06 PM.

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                • #9
                  🤮 🤮

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