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Sway 1.0 Released For This i3-Compatible Wayland Compositor

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  • Sway 1.0 Released For This i3-Compatible Wayland Compositor

    Phoronix: Sway 1.0 Released For This i3-Compatible Wayland Compositor

    Sway 1.0 is now available for this independent Wayland compositor that is inspired by the i3 X11 window manager and has matured with quite an in-depth feature set as well as evolved along with its own "WLROOTS" Wayland library...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...y-1.0-Released

  • dkasak
    replied
    Originally posted by msotirov View Post
    We on Desktop Linux need to get off the high horse rather quickly before we fall even more into irrelevance.
    Oh dear! I think you are dramatically misunderstanding the situation. I'm not some linux-desktop-gatekeeper, sitting on my 'high horse' and blocking you from developing your desktop apps in your toy language ( and as I pointed out, there are bindings for your toy language already ). I'm a developer, doing things the way I want to. Other developers are doing the things they want to. The situation is what it is. What are YOU doing? Where are YOUR patches to re-implement linux desktop libraries in a toy language? What efforts have you gone to to ensure that after this unnecessary rewrite, all supported language bindings will continue to work? I'm pretty sure your attitude would be that everyone should "get with the program" and use your toy language, and all the other languages can go to hell, right? Out of interest ... got a github profile?

    Leave a comment:


  • kneekoo
    replied
    Those screenshots made my day.

    Leave a comment:


  • msotirov
    replied
    Originally posted by dkasak View Post
    As for ergonomics mattering to 'most developers' ... I guess it depends what you mean by 'developer'. If you're talking about dime-a-dozen java 'developers' ... <yawn> ... and as for the rest, if there were such a movement of talented devs who wanted to write apps in something else, then what you're talking about would already be here ... we'd all be writing desktop apps in some god-aweful reesarch project like Go or NodeJS or whatever was in fashion.
    Well, talented or no, these spoiled developers who want to have good language ergonomics are the ones who write the apps we use daily on other platforms (Windows, macOS, iOS and Android). Also most of the web apps we use are written in these "god-aweful research projects", so yeah... What matters at the end of the day is if the product is useful and not the engineering behind it. We on Desktop Linux need to get off the high horse rather quickly before we fall even more into irrelevance.

    Leave a comment:


  • ssokolow
    replied
    Originally posted by dkasak View Post

    I guess it depends what you mean by 'developer'. If you're talking about dime-a-dozen java 'developers' ... <yawn> ... and as for the rest, if there were such a movement of talented devs who wanted to write apps in something else, then what you're talking about would already be here ... we'd all be writing desktop apps in some god-aweful reesarch project like Go or NodeJS or whatever was in fashion.

    Anyway, as people say ... patches accepted.
    ESR is part of an effort to rewrite the NTP daemon in Go for improved maintainability and I'd hardly call him a dime-a-dozen Java developer.

    That's really the big advantage of languages like Go and Rust. Improved onboarding for new developers on the team... possibly including yourself after a multi-year hiatus.
    Last edited by ssokolow; 03-15-2019, 09:23 AM.

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  • dkasak
    replied
    Originally posted by msotirov View Post
    No one's saying they haven't stood the test of time. That doesn't mean there aren't better options nowadays.

    Linux is the only platform where desktop apps are built in languages that old. The ergonomics of using a language might not matter to you but it sure as hell matters to most developers.

    What I'm trying to say is, you can continue using C for drivers and firmware, but if we want to grow our platform on the desktop, we need more developer friendly options for building userland apps.
    There are a plethora of options. I do a lot of perl-gtk3 development, and I'm starting to move some things to pygtk. There are bindings for gtk and qt for every major language around - including C#. Small-scale projects will continue to use 3GLs, and larger ones will use C / C++. I don't see the problem here. As for ergonomics mattering to 'most developers' ... I guess it depends what you mean by 'developer'. If you're talking about dime-a-dozen java 'developers' ... <yawn> ... and as for the rest, if there were such a movement of talented devs who wanted to write apps in something else, then what you're talking about would already be here ... we'd all be writing desktop apps in some god-aweful reesarch project like Go or NodeJS or whatever was in fashion.

    Anyway, as people say ... patches accepted.

    Leave a comment:


  • msotirov
    replied
    Originally posted by dkasak View Post

    Newer, in the languages space, doesn't mean better. The opposite. C has stood the test of time, and people use it because it's blindingly fast, and doesn't change every 3 months.
    No one's saying they haven't stood the test of time. That doesn't mean there aren't better options nowadays.

    Linux is the only platform where desktop apps are built in languages that old. The ergonomics of using a language might not matter to you but it sure as hell matters to most developers.

    What I'm trying to say is, you can continue using C for drivers and firmware, but if we want to grow our platform on the desktop, we need more developer friendly options for building userland apps.

    Leave a comment:


  • dkasak
    replied
    Originally posted by msotirov View Post
    You are right. But for KDE and Gnome It's been 20 years and not 2 or 3. And the programming languages they use are twice that age!
    Newer, in the languages space, doesn't mean better. The opposite. C has stood the test of time, and people use it because it's blindingly fast, and doesn't change every 3 months.

    Leave a comment:


  • msotirov
    replied
    Originally posted by dkasak View Post

    Serious projects don't rewrite every 2-3 years to target <INSERT LATEST LANGUAGE HERE>.
    You are right. But for KDE and Gnome It's been 20 years and not 2 or 3. And the programming languages they use are twice that age!

    Leave a comment:


  • polarathene
    replied
    Originally posted by stingray454 View Post
    My main gripe with most distros nowdays is mixed DPI support - HiDPI on multiple screens works fine in many distros, but when using for example a 4k laptop screen with a 1920x1080 monitor things are usually really broken. I understand Sway handles this really well, did anyone try mixed DPI and can confirm this? Would be really good hearing your experiences.

    Also, does things like games under Wine run well with Sway? Is XWayland handling this?

    If I can find a good DE that can handle all my use-cases seamlessly I'll swap in a heartbeat
    AFAIK, that's mostly an X11 issue? I remember working on a screen recorder/snapshot utility and it would get both of my displays as a single image unless I requested a cropped region. I imagine it's something due to that?

    With Wayland it's different, and I believe a non-issue with others supporting Wayland like KDE? It's just the more larger/complex distros aren't exactly Wayland ready yet, either from lacking features or not being stable/reliable for certain usage/drivers. So while your wish might be solved with Wayland, it might be trading in one issue for another atm.

    Leave a comment:

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