Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mir Devs Are Still Working On An Example Mir Desktop Session For Ubuntu 18.04

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Faalagorn
    replied
    Originally posted by papajo View Post
    I believe that freesync and audio over HDMI is still not possible with the amdgpu/mesa drivers yet they are like must have features for the average user... but they have done tons of stuff in other obscure parts of the driver that like 10% or less of the people use or will notice that they exist at all...
    They both work, but one require a recent kernel + possibly a kernel parameter and the latter is just not upstreamed yet, slowly getting a better implemenation over what proprietary AMD drivers provided.

    Leave a comment:


  • papajo
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    FYI: people using linux distros don't generate revenue, people using computing nodes (with AMD hardware) or in the embedded market (that needs a license change because they don't like GPL) do.
    That's short-minded thinking people will generate revenue as long as the first milestone has been reached where a linux distro can provide basic entertainment features without major drawbacks.

    And it will be much easier revenue (like e.g the android market boom) because everything will be new and the userbase will skyrocket, especially for freelancers.

    I believe this point will be reached if Vulkan becomes mainstream and more games use it instead of d3d.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by papajo View Post
    I dont know what devs even think sometimes by neglecting simple yet popular stuff... the more non techy users come into a Ubuntu or linux hud in general the more their work will be worth in the long run and also their revenue as devs for such things.

    I believe that freesync and audio over HDMI is still not possible with the amdgpu/mesa drivers yet they are like must have features for the average user... but they have done tons of stuff in other obscure parts of the driver that like 10% or less of the people use or will notice that they exist at all...
    FYI: people using linux distros don't generate revenue, people using computing nodes (with AMD hardware) or in the embedded market (that needs a license change because they don't like GPL) do.

    Leave a comment:


  • papajo
    replied
    Originally posted by elvenbone View Post

    Maybe because the popular stuff sometimes isn't simple? If freesync and audio over HDMI were so simple, someone else might have done it by now. When you start by developing the fancy bits, it can quickly bite you because you haven't laid the ground work of the unpopular stuff.
    Well, both are like well established standards and both are already supported for older GPUs so there is no "reinventing the wheel" also Nvidia (which gets dissed a lot for not caring about its linux drivers that much) does support their basic functions (such as nvec recording,audio over HDMI,gsync )

    And why X works with OBS but its newer iteration (which is supposed to be better and an upgrade to X) does not?

    Those are just 2 examples, I know, but the general feel I have about software updates related one way or an other to linux is that they always try to achieve an obscure technical spec that either does not change that much in terms of end user experience or even does not change anything at all or if it does then its only appreciable by a small group of users. A recent example is the latest comparison here in phoronix LLVM 6 vs 5... I assume (because compilers are the hardest part in programming) that upgrading such a thing is very difficult and many knowledgeable people must have spend quite a few dozens of working hours each and kudos for that etc but really nobody will feel any difference... bring e.g freesync to the masses on the other hand and everybody will talk about that update.

    I think linux devs, in general, should aim (at least at this point in time ) to bring people from Windows and Macs to linux by giving them similar functionality and accommodate their every day habits so that they dont feel that they downgraded.

    On the bright side wine gets vulkan support which will certainly lead to more people being able to play their favorite windows games without compromising that much on average frame-rates...
    Last edited by papajo; 14 March 2018, 05:18 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • elvenbone
    replied
    Originally posted by papajo View Post
    neglecting simple yet popular stuff
    Maybe because the popular stuff sometimes isn't simple? If freesync and audio over HDMI were so simple, someone else might have done it by now. When you start by developing the fancy bits, it can quickly bite you because you haven't laid the ground work of the unpopular stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • techzilla
    replied
    Originally posted by andre30correia View Post

    only RedHat projects are community! The rest need to die
    You can do open source without community-developer interaction, which is common for most of the biggest companies like Google, but it basically means you ensure that widespread adoption is impossible unless you can force it down our throats. RedHat does default open development for their system level projects, but the most important reason they win is because they take the effort to meet a broad set of needs. Not just user needs, not just their internal needs, not just developer needs, not just maintainer needs, but they put in as much effort as possible to weigh all the conflicting concerns. They address the concerns that are inexpensive to address, and then explain publicly when they cannot meet other concerns despite best effort.

    What this means is that they have larger swaths of good faith built up, and a running start on how we skeptical we should be to accept a project they are funding/promoting. Now not all projects get the full amount of community consideration, but by starting the work fairly open, they at least show they care about getting community acceptance. That's how you win this game, not by beginning the game as Redhat, but by putting more into the community so that they don't reject your work.

    I didn't buy every line I read by RedHat loyal parties, I read up on the architecture, and I checked the code bases. What I found was Ubuntu not playing ball, to the detriment of the community, and then I saw them do it again and again... and you know what? I was a Debian user for years, then a Ubuntu user for years, but I thought about who is putting the most into the infrastructural components of my system. Who is digging the most to get us out of our hole, to address our terrible graphics situation? I thought about who is actively building community, and who is extracting from already existing communities?

    That's when I switched to Fedora.

    You wanna usurp RedHat? Give a sh*t like Redhat, we're more than willing to listen to your offerings.
    Last edited by techzilla; 14 March 2018, 04:43 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • papajo
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

    This will basically be the dealmaker for me.

    The developers of OBS have already mentioned that they are not going to implement DE-specific code for screen recording and livestreaming because of the maintenance burden, and that until a standard Wayland protocol or extension is available for such needs, there will be no Wayland compatibility in OBS.

    if Mir as a Wayland compositor and display server gets adopted widely enough for OBS to support it as the sole means for screen recording and livestreaming under Wayland, I'm switching to a DE that uses it in a heartbeat. I may keep a Plasma Wayland / Gnome Wayland option around for work since I'm used to those environments though.

    But until then, I will still be switching to an X session to livestream my Kancolle gameplay.
    I dont know what devs even think sometimes by neglecting simple yet popular stuff... the more non techy users come into a Ubuntu or linux hud in general the more their work will be worth in the long run and also their revenue as devs for such things.

    I believe that freesync and audio over HDMI is still not possible with the amdgpu/mesa drivers yet they are like must have features for the average user... but they have done tons of stuff in other obscure parts of the driver that like 10% or less of the people use or will notice that they exist at all...

    Leave a comment:


  • andre30correia
    replied
    Originally posted by Kemosabe View Post

    Closed upstream developments won't be accepted by the community and will be forgotten eventually.
    only RedHat projects are community! The rest need to die

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by papajo View Post
    If OBS works with it and the compositor doesnt drop FPS on games It would be perfect.. lets not forget that most home computers are used for entertainment/gaming/streaming etc not as terminals that need to comply with obscure standards only the devs and a small margin of people even know what they are for in the first place..
    This will basically be the dealmaker for me.

    The developers of OBS have already mentioned that they are not going to implement DE-specific code for screen recording and livestreaming because of the maintenance burden, and that until a standard Wayland protocol or extension is available for such needs, there will be no Wayland compatibility in OBS.

    if Mir as a Wayland compositor and display server gets adopted widely enough for OBS to support it as the sole means for screen recording and livestreaming under Wayland, I'm switching to a DE that uses it in a heartbeat. I may keep a Plasma Wayland / Gnome Wayland option around for work since I'm used to those environments though.

    But until then, I will still be switching to an X session to livestream my Kancolle gameplay.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Kemosabe View Post
    Closed upstream developments won't be accepted by the community and will be forgotten eventually.
    No project forces developers to show each developer's own personal "wor-in-progress" source tree, nor licenses require it, why this requirement is suddenly required to be "accepted by the community"?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X