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Vulkan 1.1.108 Released With Two New Extensions

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Weasel View Post
    I mean sure, you don't have to use certain extensions, but if you don't know about them, how can you know that your current way of doing something in Vulkan is optimal or the best way to achieve it?
    What about searching in the extension archive https://www.khronos.org/registry/vulkan/ for the extensions related to your task?

    I mean, how is people supposed to learn and keep up-to-date about stuff? You look it up.

    Having so many extensions doesn't really help Vulkan here with this, in my opinion.
    It's not designed to make development easier, it's designed to provide the best possible access to hardware features, for developers and companies that want peak performance in their specific application.

    People that need easy development can go and use a framework that abstracts it away
    https://github.com/GPUOpen-LibrariesAndSDKs/V-EZ
    https://www.bsframework.io/
    https://github.com/GPUOpen-LibrariesAndSDKs/Anvil
    or a third party game engine (which also abstracts much more than just graphics rendering).
    Last edited by starshipeleven; 05-14-2019, 10:06 AM.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Weasel View Post
      Pretty much yeah. The problem is that it'll end up in a situation where just making use of all these extensions will require too much memorization of millions of them.

      I mean sure, you don't have to use certain extensions, but if you don't know about them, how can you know that your current way of doing something in Vulkan is optimal or the best way to achieve it? So technically you'd have to know about (most) extensions just to know which to use and which not to in a particular situation and application. The burden will just be too great cause it seems it's never going to slow down.

      Remember that the Direct3D propaganda against OpenGL was also mostly about development and documentation, i.e. people were brainwashed to think that OpenGL was just too hard to get into compared to Direct3D. Having so many extensions doesn't really help Vulkan here with this, in my opinion.
      You have lots of new extensions appearing all the time simply because the hardware and the requirements are always evolving. The alternative would be an API frozen in time that would quickly be discarded by application developers for being obsolete and inadequate.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Weasel View Post
        Pretty much yeah. The problem is that it'll end up in a situation where just making use of all these extensions will require too much memorization of millions of them.

        I mean sure, you don't have to use certain extensions, but if you don't know about them, how can you know that your current way of doing something in Vulkan is optimal or the best way to achieve it? So technically you'd have to know about (most) extensions just to know which to use and which not to in a particular situation and application. The burden will just be too great cause it seems it's never going to slow down.

        Remember that the Direct3D propaganda against OpenGL was also mostly about development and documentation, i.e. people were brainwashed to think that OpenGL was just too hard to get into compared to Direct3D. Having so many extensions doesn't really help Vulkan here with this, in my opinion.
        That's kind of like saying that no one can learn C++ because there are too many libraries out there for people to memorize and wouldn't it be better if there was just a single way to do everything that was built into the core language?

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        • #14
          Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
          That's kind of like saying that no one can learn C++ because there are too many libraries out there for people to memorize and wouldn't it be better if there was just a single way to do everything that was built into the core language?
          Nah, that's a bad analogy. Libraries don't enable you to do stuff you can't do alone (usually, unless they are low level abstract interfaces). Unlike Vulkan where you can't do that stuff without it (at the same speed) no matter how optimized you write your code. With libraries you can just do whatever they are doing yourself or copy-paste it from somewhere.

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