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Microsoft's New Open-Source Project Is "Shader Conductor" For Cross-Compiling HLSL

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  • Microsoft's New Open-Source Project Is "Shader Conductor" For Cross-Compiling HLSL

    Phoronix: Microsoft's New Open-Source Project Is "Shader Conductor" For Cross-Compiling HLSL

    The latest open-source project out of Microsoft under an MIT license is Shader Conductor, which allows for cross-compiling HLSL to other languages -- including GLSL for OpenGL/Vulkan usage...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ader-Conductor

  • #2
    Presumably their hope is that game developers will focus on a Direct3D/HLSL-first workflow and only later than focus on other graphics APIs like OpenGL/Vulkan/Metal, rather than the other way around.
    More choice for the developers, the better, right?

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    • #3
      Microsoft is preparing for the Windows L world, the linux-based Windows distro of the future... For that, they need to ensure portability of HLSL to OpenGL/Vulkan...

      It is ridiculous to assume this is a move to ensure people target HLSL first... They do this ANYWAY. Remember, Direct3D reigns supreme. For them to actually bother to make an opensource project like that.... Makes one think...

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      • #4
        Well there was sometime ago news about gaming as a service running on cloud instances, so you wouldn't need a powerful GPU to render them. Maybe they are going to deploy something like this using Linux as the cloud or for various motives...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TheOne View Post
          Well there was sometime ago news about gaming as a service running on cloud instances, so you wouldn't need a powerful GPU to render them. Maybe they are going to deploy something like this using Linux as the cloud or for various motives...
          The network infrastructure isn't anywhere near good enough for that in countries where people would actually pay for the service.

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          • #6
            Just why? Are they really planning on going to release a Windows-compatible Linux system like I'm joking for some time? Something like a Linux with a Windows desktop environment?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              The network infrastructure isn't anywhere near good enough for that in countries where people would actually pay for the service.
              I agree with this and it's a big reason why streamed video games will, at least initially fail, but the games industry is clearly moving towards this anyway. Microsoft, Sony, Nvidia, EA, Ubisoft and others are making big investments in this area as we speak. Valve hasn't said anything but I think they are working on it behind the scenes as well and I actually think Proton is part of it because it allows them to use Linux servers instead of having to pay for a huge amount of Windows licenses. This might actually have been Protons purpose all along to be honest.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Brisse View Post
                I agree with this and it's a big reason why streamed video games will, at least initially fail
                On one side, media companies like Netflix, Hulu, and game companies like Valve, Sony, EA, on the other we have the champions of the past decades, the same scumbag ISPs that didn't give a shit!

                Who will win? The undisputed multi-year champions with the technology or the new companies that need the bandwith to serve their content?

                I'll grab my popcorn, but it will be a slaughter.

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                • #9
                  Couldn't this be refactored so that SPIR-V Cross produces DXIL?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    I'll grab my popcorn, but it will be a slaughter.
                    On the other hand, it could be a big win for Linux gaming if gaming in the cloud ever takes off in a big way.
                    - You could easily stream games to any device. No need to port games between platforms.
                    - The datacenters powering these streaming services will probably prefer to run Linux, which might convince game developers to target Linux.
                    - Valve, Intel, AMD and others have already done the heavy lifting in making Linux a viable games platform. Other big players like EA and Ubisoft might now swoop in and start using Linux for running games in the cloud even though their userbase is largely Windows or console.

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