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Features You Won't Find In The Linux 4.9 Mainline Kernel

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  • Features You Won't Find In The Linux 4.9 Mainline Kernel

    Phoronix: Features You Won't Find In The Linux 4.9 Mainline Kernel

    While there are many new features in Linux 4.9, there is some functionality we've been looking forward to that sadly isn't yet in the mainline kernel tree...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...f-Not-Mainline

  • #2
    For those wanting to try DAL the best place to get the code is https://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/...md-staging-4.7 (probably soon to be 4.8) there's no point in using the older wip-dal branches as they haven't been updated in ages

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    • #3
      I've been hoping for RichACL to be merged TBH...

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      • #4
        cik amdgpu by deafult

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        • #5
          I thought one of the problem of DAL was that it is an abstraction (the A in DAL), so it won't ever be merged a long as the name contains the A?

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          • #6
            It's been bugging me for a while now. Is it always the case that you bump it up with decimals like this:
            4.10 which is not version 4.1

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sethox View Post
              It's been bugging me for a while now. Is it always the case that you bump it up with decimals like this:
              4.10 which is not version 4.1
              bugs me too, if they labelled preceding releases as 4.08, 4.09 etc it would be less confusing when you see 4.10. might make directory listings a bit more sensible, i've seen some that list them in this order 4.1, 4.10, 4.2, 4.3 etc

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              • #8
                They shouldn't use a decimal point character for something that is NOT a decimal point.

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                • #9
                  Typically, version numbers are not decimals, but rather a list of integers, and each one can be incremented. Some software projects use two numbers (like 4.9, followed by 4.10), which does look like a decimal and can be kinda confusing for some people, I guess. Other projects use three numbers (1.9.19 followed by 1.9.20, maybe followed by 1.10.0). I've even seen four numbers.

                  So yeah, that's how version numbers work. The dot is a separator, not a decimal point.

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                  • #10
                    * Grasky2's -mnative patch
                    * LTO compiling
                    * linux-tiny patches
                    * grsec
                    ....

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