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The Most Amazing OpenGL Tech Demo In 64kb

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Tobai View Post
    The only thing *amazing* about this is the 64kb. Beyond that, it's rather pathetic for 2014.
    full Phong shading, raytraced realtime
    smooth geometry animation (waves and that bending, fully in shaders and working with the lighting)
    raytraced "god rays"
    realistic marble textures, completely generated
    portals
    etc etc

    you don't find that impressive ?

    funny that the people who make this kind of demos also made those "modern games", and they think this is impressive

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Tobai View Post
      The only thing *amazing* about this is the 64kb. Beyond that, it's rather pathetic for 2014.
      Are you guys trolling or is it really that you're dumb as fuck?

      Obviously "size matters" here. Additionally, it's about how far you can get concerning the quality of the content.
      And in this case they got far. Very far.

      Without doubt this is an amazing achievement.
      If you argue the graphics don't compare to the latest XYZ Engine tech demo, you failed to see what this is about.
      It's rather you being pathetic.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by caligula View Post
        You should study the history of demoscene to learn that. The demoscene started as a spinoff, originating from "cracks" in pirate games and software. The hackers first just broke the copy protection system from the distribution and repacked the software stamping their own trademark all over the pirate distribution. A bit later they added some greetings file with fancy ASCII art and later greetz as a small .com/.exe intro in mode 13h. These demos lead to a serious competition between few groups like Razor 1911. Later they found other forums for publishing these results, e.g. the annual Assembly event in Finland. So the roots are in very low moral and ethics and basically stealing of commercial software. If you think of this pirate attitude and the need to compete with other criminals, they found it easier to not share anything. You had to be intelligent enough to figure it out yourself. It's like anti GNU.
        The demoscene has decoupled from the cracking scene decades ago.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by entropy View Post
          The demoscene has decoupled from the cracking scene decades ago.
          Yes but the closed source ideology is still there. I know this for a fact. Some of my friends were part of demoscene (altparty/boozembly). They refused to tell how they do their stuff. I only learnt about the actual algorithms much later when they started documenting demos in the web. They had lots of pride in their work and found it lame (noob = lamer) to share good stuff.
          Last edited by caligula; 20 April 2014, 04:27 PM.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by caligula View Post
            Yes but the closed source ideology is still there. I know this for a fact. Some of my friends were part of demoscene (altparty/boozembly). They refused to tell how they do their stuff. I only learnt about the actual algorithms much later when they started documenting demos in the web. They had lots of pride in their work and found it lame (noob = lamer) to share good stuff.
            But that's just part of the game.
            Best explained on legacy hardware, when groups tried to
            recreate or even beat an effect seen by other groups.

            Usually that is a really healthy competition.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by caligula View Post
              Yes but the closed source ideology is still there. I know this for a fact. Some of my friends were part of demoscene (altparty/boozembly). They refused to tell how they do their stuff. I only learnt about the actual algorithms much later when they started documenting demos in the web. They had lots of pride in their work and found it lame (noob = lamer) to share good stuff.
              Illusionists/magicians don't share their tricks either.

              It's a part of the job.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by caligula View Post
                You should study the history of demoscene to learn that. The demoscene started as a spinoff, originating from "cracks" in pirate games and software. The hackers first just broke the copy protection system from the distribution and repacked the software stamping their own trademark all over the pirate distribution. A bit later they added some greetings file with fancy ASCII art and later greetz as a small .com/.exe intro in mode 13h. These demos lead to a serious competition between few groups like Razor 1911. Later they found other forums for publishing these results, e.g. the annual Assembly event in Finland. So the roots are in very low moral and ethics and basically stealing of commercial software. If you think of this pirate attitude and the need to compete with other criminals, they found it easier to not share anything. You had to be intelligent enough to figure it out yourself. It's like anti GNU.
                We all descend from monkeys.
                Are we monkeys?
                Do we behave like monkeys?

                I don't think so...

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                • #28
                  open source

                  On C64, ZX Spectrum, Amiga, Atari ST, where demo scene started an flourished, all intros/demos were written in assembly language, so open-sourced or not was not even an meaningful question at the time. I stopped following this scene some 22 years ago, when it started fading off alongside Amiga and Atari ST computers. PC was uninspiring, and simply not constructed for fun, from demo-scene perspective. Well, I see it evaluated...

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                  • #29
                    A "Hello World" C example with one line of code compiles to a 6.7 kB ELF if anyone wants to know.

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                    • #30
                      Good demos they made , this renders fine on opensource radeonsi:

                      http://www.pouet.net/prod.php?which=62853

                      but somewhere at 4 minute LLVM goes out of registers . The same with old directx popular demo runned in wine

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBpo5GHcmsE&fmt=22

                      Renders fine, but somewhere in the middle of rendering demo LLVM broke . So it is common with rendering these demos LLVM just goes out of registers .

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