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Direct3D 9 Support Released For Linux Via Gallium3D, Running Games

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  • #51
    Originally posted by elanthis View Post
    Not at all. WinXP is still the dominant OS in many parts of the world. Gl is still a horrible API with buggy-as-hell drivers commonplace. Companies that are smart enough to target more than just the US still want to target DX9 for at least a couple years until/unless China and the like starts pirating Windows 7 instead of XP.
    WinXP is EOL next year and most game makers do *not* care about the majority. If they did, their recommended specs wouldn't contain $300+ graphics cards.
    Many games released this year are already DX11-only. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ctX_11_support you can sort it by games that are DX11 only.

    I'd honestly be curious how much of a % China makes up of game buyers anyways.
    2%? 3%?
    I'd imagine North America + European markets make up the massive majority.

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    • #52
      Originally posted by peppercats View Post
      WinXP is EOL next year and most game makers do *not* care about the majority. If they did, their recommended specs wouldn't contain $300+ graphics cards.
      Many games released this year are already DX11-only. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ctX_11_support you can sort it by games that are DX11 only.

      I'd honestly be curious how much of a % China makes up of game buyers anyways.
      2%? 3%?
      I'd imagine North America + European markets make up the massive majority.
      well the point is there are a freaking bunch of games already for DX9 that this will help you to play on linux with better performance those DX9 games later maybe this project can be expanded other revisions, you have to start somewhere

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      • #53
        Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
        Right now it's so much easier and less error prone to just boot windows when you wanna play.... For many years nothing will change in Linux when it comes to games. Things are starting to move but it will take many years before we will be able to play windows games on Linux at similar performance.
        Last time I used AMD's blob, I had around the same performance (around because I wasn't benchmarking, was not and am not really interested on benchmarking games) when playing Doom 3 on Windows XP and Linux on a Mobility Radeon HD 3200, with the only noticeable difference it overheated on Windows but not on Linux (I had no faith on Linux for gaming, but I got tired of overheating and gave it a shot). It's the only game I played back then, though, so it's not really representative.

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        • #54
          Originally posted by peppercats View Post
          Not much to celebrate, DX9 is dead. This will probably be the last year of any real DX9 support, but most major titles don't have it.
          On the upside, many titles are getting linux ports.
          Given that SC2 is pretty much the only game I'm playing lately, it's pretty celebration-worthy for me, hence why it exists.

          It also proves that it's possible to actually write a D3D state tracker that works and is usable, and all that within a couple of months, given favourable circumstances.

          In principle D3D11 is even easier to support because there is no fixed function pipeline and it's even closer to gallium. The problem is, no gallium driver supports the required feature set at this point, TGSI can't even handle SM4 yet, and there are no tests or an existing open implementation (wined3d) available to clarify how things are supposed to behave, so the time for it hasn't come.

          Motivation is key, but as there are no motivating D3D11-only games/applications yet, neither the wine devs nor the mesa devs seem to care much. But the existence of a working D3D st should provide some hope should anyone ever think of reviving/rewriting d3d1x.
          Last edited by calim; 07-17-2013, 03:41 PM.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by calim View Post
            Given that SC2 is pretty much the only game I'm playing lately, it's pretty celebration-worthy for me, hence why it exists.

            It also proves that it's possible to actually write a D3D state tracker that works and is usable, and all that within a couple of months, given favourable circumstances.

            In principle D3D11 is even easier to support because there is no fixed function pipeline and it's even closer to gallium. The problem is, no gallium driver supports the required feature set at this point, TGSI can't even handle SM4 yet, and there are no tests or an existing open implementation (wined3d) available to clarify how things are supposed to behave, so the time for it hasn't come.

            Motivation is key, but as there are no motivating D3D11-only games/applications yet, neither the wine devs nor the mesa devs seem to care much. But the existence of a working D3D st should provide some hope should anyone ever think of reviving/rewriting d3d1x.
            I is possible to use your dx9adapter native on Linux. E.g. some game company to port their existing DX windows title to Linux, using SDL as DX replacement but keeping d3d renderer?
            I guess pipe drivers will not gain dx11 features, until Mesa's OGL reaches 4.x, so DX11 tracker would allow for drivers evolve up to SM 4. But yes, testing will be a problem.
            Thanks for your work, Christoph.

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            • #56
              Originally posted by Drago View Post
              I is possible to use your dx9adapter native on Linux. E.g. some game company to port their existing DX windows title to Linux, using SDL as DX replacement but keeping d3d renderer?
              Yes but I don't see why you'd want to. You could just -lwine and compile. The idea of using D3D9 on linux is rather abhorrent and unless someone writes pipe_gl.so I refuse to even entertain the notion. There used to be an Xlib backend but I let it rot and eventually nuked it when it wasn't useful for testing anymore.

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              • #57
                Originally posted by zhasha View Post
                Yes but I don't see why you'd want to. You could just -lwine and compile. The idea of using D3D9 on linux is rather abhorrent and unless someone writes pipe_gl.so I refuse to even entertain the notion. There used to be an Xlib backend but I let it rot and eventually nuked it when it wasn't useful for testing anymore.
                Why is it abhorrent? Enabling netively another graphics API is a pretty damn good thing for linux gaming... I'm not saying it should be used for future development, but it enhances the value of the entire graphics stack and proves the decisions that hurt developers and users were worth it.

                Originally posted by zhasha View Post
                Minor point but you're thinking of DRM. DRI is an X11 extension that allows X applications to authenticate and use DRM drivers with X11 surfaces. We've since gone to DRI2 and soon DRI3.
                Right, sorry. I get those mixed up quite often.

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by Serafean View Post
                  Why is it abhorrent?
                  Because people will think "oh, we can use D3D9 on linux, let's just use that for our new game! Yay, free crossplatform/Xbox support!"

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by zhasha View Post
                    Because people will think "oh, we can use D3D9 on linux, let's just use that for our new game! Yay, free crossplatform/Xbox support!"
                    So what is wrong with that?

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                    • #60
                      Originally posted by Drago View Post
                      So what is wrong with that?
                      If DirectX is upheld as the standard graphics API for GNU games instead of OpenGL, then we will become dependant on a technology fully under the control of quite the hostile entity. That is the critical difference being OpenGL being the standard and DirectX-- OpenGL is, as it's name suggests, an open standard, and not controllable by any 'enemy' of GNU.

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