Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Direct3D 10/11 Is Now Natively Implemented On Linux!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • glxextxexlg
    replied
    so... whose shit will be dominant as a web3d standard? Its still not clear which API will be dominant in 3D web, which will be a major step forward in the history of internet. MS d3d or cross platform OGL? It is likely due to its crossplatform nature OGL ES seems to have better chances. If I were an MS top guy I would gather a team to implement d3d1x for OSX and Linux. and don't care if any other implementation infringes patents or whatnot.

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    You'll also never win if you don't support doc. Alternative formats aren't useful to MS Office users. So you lose.

    Leave a comment:


  • pingufunkybeat
    replied
    And what is the reason why we're still not compatible with MS Office formats or the broken MS HTML and other things?

    The solution was to move away from those formats and push free alternatives. If you play a game of catch with MS using their formats which they are constantly changing to make you incompatible, you'll never win.

    15 years later, and we STILL can't read .doc files correctly. It's broken enough to scare many people away from OpenOffice.

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    Which is also the reason why everyone who went against Linux till now failed; there's no one to go against. You can sue Red Hat, you can sue Novell, you can sue God Almighty. But in the end, we don't care. Neither RH nor Novell owns Linux. No one owns it. Good luck filing lawsuits against Linux users.

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    There is no central authority for "Linux", so there's no problem. On OS X, the authority and the one responsible is Apple. On Linux, we don't have such thing. We're free to do whatever the hell we want. MS has no one to sue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bitiquinho
    replied
    Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post

    It was VERY difficult to get decent support for MS Office formats, NTFS, Samba, Exchange, and many other MS-only technologies which we now have on Linux.
    But having this support, even if it's not perfect, isn't something that counts points for Linux ? I mean, we have some significant and continuously developed support for .doc/.docx documents, windows shared folders, NTFS partitions, windows aplications, etc... but they don't have the same support for Linux (it sucks to not being able to even see what's inside an ext3/ext4 partition on windows, and the applications made for that never worked for me).

    The same way, having better (or begining to have) support for Direct3D 10/11 doesn't make Linux dependent of M$, only add more possibilities and capabilities for what we can do.... we can have Linux and Windows software, but windows users will only have their native software... I think this is numbers advantage

    Mac OS doesn't have native DX implementation, but uses Cider to do the same thing that Wine does. Also if having OpenGL is sufficient to make an good gaming plataform, having both OpenGL and D3D can make it even greater, Linux don't have to limitate itself to what Mac OS or another OS can do.

    Thanks for your reply

    Leave a comment:


  • pingufunkybeat
    replied
    Originally posted by Bitiquinho View Post
    Is there really need for panic about what can Microsoft do against Linux ?
    Yes, althought they (MS) are not as aggressive about it as they used to be.

    It was VERY difficult to get decent support for MS Office formats, NTFS, Samba, Exchange, and many other MS-only technologies which we now have on Linux.

    Adding another MS-only technology will only put us in the same boat again.

    MacOSX does not support Direct3d, and is a major gaming platform. As long as this is the case, there is ZERO need for Direct3d on Linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bitiquinho
    replied
    Hi, first of all, sorry if my English is bad... first time posting at a foreign forum...

    I became to much interested in this news about Gallium3D, and I'm looking for as much information as I can found... I read all the posts in this topic looking for more technical info about this API's possibilities of implementation, and I found it, but most part of the posts are about some ideological discussion about how much the use of this resource hurt the open source community... I really think this is important, but that's really the place for it ? Also, if both OpenGL and DX are closed-source, developers won't be limited by some group's internal decisions anyway ? Is there really need for panic about what can Microsoft do against Linux ? Or there is some important difference in the licenses ?.... I still don't understand how exactly this API works... I need to install D3D somehow in my OS to make it work, or Gallium3D completely replace it translating DX calls to TGSI language ? (I'm saying it in theory, i know that's being developed yet)

    I must say I don't want Linux to become some kind of Windows clone just to attract shitty Windows users who don't admit writing 1 line in the terminal or something like that, I want it to always find a better and more efficient way of doing things, and it's obvious that's the best to estimulate developers to continue/start using OpenGL (and I think who always developed for Linux will do this anyway), since it's cross-platform, but for a possible improved Wine/DX support, that can attract Windows developers and make easier software porting, I think there's nothing wrong...

    I hope you understand my view point ( and my English xD )... I know it can't be the best opinion, but think it's at least logical...

    Leave a comment:


  • Remco
    replied
    I see one big advantage of these state trackers. They actually provide proof as to whether the D3D > OpenGL translation in Wine causes slowdowns. When both methods implement the API sufficiently, we can do actual benchmarks. It's a win-win situation: whichever way the benchmark would turn out, it would be the final nail in the coffin of those arguments that Wine is necessarily slower than Windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • zhasha
    replied
    Originally posted by imamdxl View Post
    Is there any possibility that Direct3D 9 is also implemented by the same way. Because there are thousands of existing Direct3D 9 games that can be played by WINE.
    I feel like replying to all you D3D9 wishing people. I was the one working on it for fun and I scrapped all the code (because it sucked). Luca inspired me to pick it back up again and I just committed a working trivial/clear case to my personal repo.
    It doesn't do anything besides clear, but it does work in WINE provided you compile the specific target:
    Code:
    scons statetrackers=nine drivers=r300 winsys=radeon targets=libd3d9-wine
    and pass it the right env vars
    Code:
    LD_LIBRARY_PATH=~/Programming/mesa/build/linux-x86-debug/lib/ D3D9_DLL_DRIVERS_DIR=~/Programming/mesa/build/linux-x86-debug/lib/ D3D9_DLL_DEBUG=all NINE_DEBUG=all wine Direct3DDevice.exe
    Please feel free to try it out or better yet, write some patches

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X