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Direct3D 10/11 Is Now Natively Implemented On Linux!

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  • Originally posted by Beiruty View Post
    Is the new code, a reversed-engineered version of MS code? Or, is it sneaked in from Ole MS?
    That's not the point The point is "what does it need to be" and then do that

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    • Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
      That's not the point The point is "what does it need to be" and then do that
      Or who will use it? and for what applications?

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      • Originally posted by Beiruty View Post
        Or who will use it? and for what applications?
        OK, first of all, this:
        On 21 September 2010 13:13, Luca Barbieri <luca at luca-barbieri.com> wrote:
        > Why are you claiming this?
        > I assume it's because of the comment in tpf.h, which states that it
        > has been written according to Microsoft's documentation, which is
        > available solely from reading the d3d11TokenizedProgramFormat.h header
        > in the DDK.
        > Using the header, which is documented in the DDK documentation as the
        > place to look for documentation of the format, as reference, doesn't
        > seem to me unusual or problematic.
        Probably virtual machine solutions will take a look at it.

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        • Luca used one of the DDK headers for documentation purposes - he definitely didn't just copy it. Howerer, the mere fact that he viewed it is making the WINE developers nervous, because they have very strict rules about such things.

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          • Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
            Luca used one of the DDK headers for documentation purposes - he definitely didn't just copy it. Howerer, the mere fact that he viewed it is making the WINE developers nervous, because they have very strict rules about such things.
            Is it a crime to read documentation and manuals?

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            • What I would like to see, honestly, is a community-driven "Long Peaks" development based on Gallium. Not a copy of DirectX (which, legal or not, is going to run into massive amounts of resistance) but something without OpenGL's supposed limitations.

              Define a new API, document it, put it up as a specification anyone can use, and go from there. Who knows, the console vendors (other than Microsoft) and the handheld vendors (again, other than Microsoft) might actually fall in love with a modern graphics standard that Kronos isn't willing to give us.

              Take the _idea_ of what DirectX does right, but not the actual API. For shaders, I'd just use GLSL unless there's a very pressing reason not to (there is nothing inherently more powerful about HLSL than GLSL, to my knowledge, but graphics are not my specialty so maybe I'm wrong). Build a reference implementation on top of Gallium3D, put out a well-defined spec, and go from there.

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              • Originally posted by Beiruty View Post
                Is it a crime to read documentation and manuals?
                Sure.

                .....

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                • Originally posted by Beiruty View Post
                  Is it a crime to read documentation and manuals?
                  No, but the fact that it was a header file means that MS lawyers could potentially call it code. And even though it's almost certain any lawsuit would go nowhere, WINE isn't interested in taking even that much risk. Therefore, they have very strict rules with no exceptions, to make sure no one ever even comes close to a grey area.

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                  • Originally posted by Beiruty View Post
                    Is it a crime to read documentation and manuals?
                    Looking? No.
                    Using? In some cases.

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                    • ... and the only generally accepted *proof* that you didn't use it is if you can claim you never saw it in the first place.

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