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Mesa's Venus Vulkan Driver Gets A Very Sizable Speed-Up

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  • Mesa's Venus Vulkan Driver Gets A Very Sizable Speed-Up

    Phoronix: Mesa's Venus Vulkan Driver Gets A Very Sizable Speed-Up

    Venus as the VirtIO-GPU Vulkan driver within Mesa and developed by Google engineers just received a nice speed-up...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Why the need for angle? Don't we have VirGL?
    ## VGA ##
    AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
    Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
      Why the need for angle? Don't we have VirGL?
      ANGLE is an implementation of OpenGL on top of Vulkan. So not a direct concorrent for VirGL.
      It is being used here because this Venus virtual GPU is Vulkan only, and they need a translation layer to test OpenGL.

      The question I would make is: why not use Zink?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jonix View Post

        ANGLE is an implementation of OpenGL on top of Vulkan. So not a direct concorrent for VirGL.
        It is being used here because this Venus virtual GPU is Vulkan only, and they need a translation layer to test OpenGL.

        The question I would make is: why not use Zink?
        Probably because it is made by Google, so they want to improve their own technology and not use "someone else's", even if Open Source code. Still I wish it was Zink.
        But I am super happy it is moving forward, and I wish maybe, just maybe in the future it could work with Windows VMs.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jonix View Post

          It is being used here because this Venus virtual GPU is Vulkan only, and they need a translation layer to test OpenGL.
          Ehm... why do they need a translation layer in the first place since we already have VirGL? That was my question.
          ## VGA ##
          AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
          Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by darkbasic View Post

            Ehm... why do they need a translation layer in the first place since we already have VirGL? That was my question.
            To test Venus, the Vulkan driver they are writing, maybe. They are not testing OpenGL, they are testing Venus. For some reason they want to use these OpenGL payloads for measurement, maybe for the sake of comparison with something specific of their interest.

            Also, Angle (and Zink) will be necessary on the world post-OpenGL drivers, where something like VirGL won't work. We are already there, there's hardware released in the wild without an OpenGL driver.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jonix View Post

              ANGLE is an implementation of OpenGL on top of Vulkan. So not a direct concorrent for VirGL.
              It is being used here because this Venus virtual GPU is Vulkan only, and they need a translation layer to test OpenGL.

              The question I would make is: why not use Zink?
              Doesn't Android use (or at least supports) ANGLE for providing OpenGL ES support so GPU drivers don't have to implement it natively? Few years ago before release of Android 10 there were some news (on Phoronix as well) that Google offers ANGLE as alternative for native OpenGL support. I don't know how is it now but it would make sense why they are not using Zink here.
              Last edited by dragon321; 17 June 2022, 05:30 PM. Reason: typo

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jonix View Post

                The question I would make is: why not use Zink?
                ANGLE is pretty old and stable in comparison to Zink, it is used in Production from long time, It is also used in Firefox, Safari, Qt5, GTA 5, Krita and many more I think https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANGLE_(software) . also Google engineer are more familiar with ANGLE

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by luno View Post
                  ANGLE is pretty old and stable in comparison to Zink, it is used in Production from long time, It is also used in Firefox, Safari, Qt5, GTA 5, Krita and many more I think https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANGLE_(software) . also Google engineer are more familiar with ANGLE
                  So now I have the question, if ANGLE is older and more stable than Zink, why did Zink came to be? What was the need for two competing implementations of OpenGL-over-Vulkan? Or was it open sourced later or something like that?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sinepgib View Post

                    So now I have the question, if ANGLE is older and more stable than Zink, why did Zink came to be? What was the need for two competing implementations of OpenGL-over-Vulkan? Or was it open sourced later or something like that?
                    ANGLE is GLES only, for starters. Even if you think adding desktop GL support to it would be less work than building Zink I believe at the time Zink was started ANGLE didn't have a Vulkan backend either as it was primarily meant for running WebGL on D3D9 so Chrome could avoid Windows GL driver bugs.

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