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Microsoft Posts Updated "DXGKRNL" Linux Kernel Driver For WSL/WSA

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  • timofonic
    replied
    This is ridiculous, but it's reality.

    Meanwhile, tons of driver issues get unaddressed.

    What about the opposite? Microsoft making a 100% DXG implementation for use in VM.

    Leave a comment:


  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    I'm trying to understand the use case for this. If I was running Windows and I wanted any kind of sophisticated graphics program to run, wouldn't I pick something native?

    I'm not trying to bash Microsoft, or WSL2, or for that matter Linux here. Now users can... what? Install Linux movie players and native Linux games in WSL2 and play them from Windows with no performance loss, or a tiny one?
    You can run android apps in a VM and get accelerated graphics on windows with this.

    It's also useful for various ML/AI apps, many of which may be based more around linux than windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    I'm trying to understand the use case for this. If I was running Windows and I wanted any kind of sophisticated graphics program to run, wouldn't I pick something native?

    I'm not trying to bash Microsoft, or WSL2, or for that matter Linux here. Now users can... what? Install Linux movie players and native Linux games in WSL2 and play them from Windows with no performance loss, or a tiny one?
    the hundreds of linux only compute programs is one such example. gamedevs who want to port to linux, and there are indeed some apps that are indeed exclusive to linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael_S
    replied
    I'm trying to understand the use case for this. If I was running Windows and I wanted any kind of sophisticated graphics program to run, wouldn't I pick something native?

    I'm not trying to bash Microsoft, or WSL2, or for that matter Linux here. Now users can... what? Install Linux movie players and native Linux games in WSL2 and play them from Windows with no performance loss, or a tiny one?

    Leave a comment:


  • amxfonseca
    replied
    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

    Well this is a technical argument as to whether Linux should be a monolithic kernel. Almost every other mainstream kernel is a hybrid kernel, i.e. they have a stable driver ABI which lets you treat drivers as modules. In Linux you only have DLKM but that breaks as soon as internal kernel headers break (which is very often).

    For better or for worse, kernel devs actively refuse to move away from a monolithic kernel.
    You also have DKMS to handle kernel upgrades, but then you need to install GCC and all the other build tools.

    I am currently dealing with that issue. I’ve prototyped a small soundcard that attaches to a raspberry Pi Zero W. The idea is to transform an existing speaker into a smart-speaker.

    I had to write a driver for it. It’s not that hard because there’s a lot already done in ALSA. So mostly I’ve added logic to control volume and mute state. Again, this just a personal project.

    The issue is now to use the driver. I cannot upstream it because nobody will accept a driver for a product that only exists inside my house. And no distro would include it.

    So I need to build an out of tree driver, but that brings a whole set of challenges. I can opt to build the driver on an external machine, but that will not allow me to upgrade the kernel on the Pi without first rebuilding the driver for the new kernel version. Which is a pain with Arch Linux.

    DKMS seems interesting solution, but that will force me to install all the build tools on the Pi. It will then rebuild the driver on such underpowered device that is not made to run a compiler.

    I never really mind the fact the all the drivers are on this single tree. I find it actually nice because you can easily find the source of any driver.

    But now I finally experienced the situation where I need to build my own driver and there’s no easy way to keep it running on my device.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spacefish
    replied
    If it relies on properitary userspace libraries anyway, why not just use shared memory between the hypervisor and the process in the linux VM using the library to implement this? Is there really a reason to have it in the kernel?

    Leave a comment:


  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by Vermilion View Post

    This could be said about almost all Kernel drivers out there...
    In the same sense you could say, why GPU drivers are embedded in the kernel, they're used on specific products, and maintained by their respective vendors.
    Well this is a technical argument as to whether Linux should be a monolithic kernel. Almost every other mainstream kernel is a hybrid kernel, i.e. they have a stable driver ABI which lets you treat drivers as modules. In Linux you only have DLKM but that breaks as soon as internal kernel headers break (which is very often).

    For better or for worse, kernel devs actively refuse to move away from a monolithic kernel.

    Leave a comment:


  • amxfonseca
    replied
    Originally posted by middy View Post
    i don't know why microsoft refuses to open source their directX api and help port it to linux. its not like they really make that much money off it. if they truly <3 linux like they claim, that be a big "see, we really do <3 linux." so far all their "<3" linux has been helping microsoft by making linux run better on windows and maybe that cascadia font. none of it has really been about "helping" linux. in comparison valve has done more to <3 linux than microsoft.
    But isn’t making Linux run good on their platform a good thing now? Wouldn’t it be nice if other vendors like nVidia, Asus, MSI would also put some effort to make Linux run better on their platforms? Instead of just not support it at all?

    I am now confused. Since when improving Linux support is a bad thing? It seems that the idea of making Linux running well on a platform can now be either good or bad, based on some arbitrary points.

    No company will contribute to Linux if there’s no benefit to them. AMD and many other do it so they can sell you hardware. Microsoft because it wants to attract developers and sell cloud services. It would not be smart for them to provide a Direct3D driver for Linux that would completely bypass their platform. It would be the equivalent of sharing the credentials of their bank account with Richard Stallman.

    In the end what matters is that code is shared with the community and someone will also benefit.

    Leave a comment:


  • pkese
    replied
    So 2022 is going to be "The year of Linux on Desktop"

    Leave a comment:


  • CochainComplex
    replied
    Originally posted by middy View Post
    i don't know why microsoft refuses to open source their directX api and help port it to linux. its not like they really make that much money off it. if they truly <3 linux like they claim, that be a big "see, we really do <3 linux." so far all their "<3" linux has been helping microsoft by making linux run better on windows and maybe that cascadia font. none of it has really been about "helping" linux. in comparison valve has done more to <3 linux than microsoft.

    i wouldn't care about microsoft wanting to make linux run on windows if microsoft just gave more equal love to linux. help improve running windows things on linux at the same time. contribute to wine. open up some of their api's as open standards, etc. encourage and help make gaming more portable. especially with microsoft buying up game studios for a few billion each.
    Basically: The Love Microsoft gives to Linux is the same Love a Pimp gives to his Prostitutes.

    Leave a comment:

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