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Open-Source Raspberry Pi Graphics Drivers Add Double Buffer Mode

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  • Open-Source Raspberry Pi Graphics Drivers Add Double Buffer Mode

    Phoronix: Open-Source Raspberry Pi Graphics Drivers Add Double Buffer Mode

    Mesa's V3D and V3DV drivers providing open-source OpenGL and Vulkan driver support, respectively, for newer Broadcom VideoCore hardware now has a double buffer mode implemented. This is a win for numerous workloads for these drivers most notably used by modern Raspberry Pi single board computers...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-Double-Buffer

  • #2
    I have a Raspberry PI 4b 4GB.

    I thought it was a good idea but graphics performance in 64 bit mode is disappointing.

    How could it be that any aged, entry level, Intel or AMD processor (10 years) with integrated graphics, outperforms it in simple tasks like running GNOME or KDE desktop compositor effects, or video playing, when the Raspberry has supposedly more modern graphics hardware?

    I don't talk about games. I talk about simple desktop use.

    And I don't understand how this machine was announced as capable of 4K video playback.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DebianLinuxero View Post
      I have a Raspberry PI 4b 4GB.

      I thought it was a good idea but graphics performance in 64 bit mode is disappointing.

      How could it be that any aged, entry level, Intel or AMD processor (10 years) with integrated graphics, outperforms it in simple tasks like running GNOME or KDE desktop compositor effects, or video playing, when the Raspberry has supposedly more modern graphics hardware?

      I don't talk about games. I talk about simple desktop use.

      And I don't understand how this machine was announced as capable of 4K video playback.
      I agree with you.
      Most ARM designs have rather poor performance, unless it's from Apple or Ampere.
      I honestly was surprised to see that a Raspberry Pi was only as fast as my Phenom...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DebianLinuxero View Post
        I have a Raspberry PI 4b 4GB.

        I thought it was a good idea but graphics performance in 64 bit mode is disappointing.

        How could it be that any aged, entry level, Intel or AMD processor (10 years) with integrated graphics, outperforms it in simple tasks like running GNOME or KDE desktop compositor effects, or video playing, when the Raspberry has supposedly more modern graphics hardware?

        I don't talk about games. I talk about simple desktop use.
        r
        And I don't understand how this machine was announced as capable of 4K video playback.
        Simply put, those processors are runnint at 2Ghz+while with lots of power room while the Pi is not. So, the AMD and Intel have lots of legacy and other hardware dedicated to those use cases, while the Pi GPUs are very lean to conserve power and cost.

        Comment


        • #5
          Why do you expect high performance from a cumputer that can run off of a 15W power supply?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dlq84 View Post
            Why do you expect high performance from a cumputer that can run off of a 15W power supply?
            Because Apple did it.
            The Mac mini only consumes 30W while having similar single-thread performance as a 9900K.

            As much as I hate saying that...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DebianLinuxero View Post
              How could it be that any aged, entry level, Intel or AMD processor (10 years) with integrated graphics, outperforms it in simple tasks like running GNOME or KDE desktop compositor effects, or video playing, when the Raspberry has supposedly more modern graphics hardware?
              Oh, that's easy. Most of modern ARM SBCs have a fraction of memory bandwidth of 10yo x86 systems.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DebianLinuxero View Post
                I have a Raspberry PI 4b 4GB.

                I thought it was a good idea but graphics performance in 64 bit mode is disappointing.

                How could it be that any aged, entry level, Intel or AMD processor (10 years) with integrated graphics, outperforms it in simple tasks like running GNOME or KDE desktop compositor effects, or video playing, when the Raspberry has supposedly more modern graphics hardware?

                I don't talk about games. I talk about simple desktop use.

                And I don't understand how this machine was announced as capable of 4K video playback.
                it's capable of 4k video playback using OpenELEC. everything else - in case of problems, blame the drivers/other software.

                in case of poor desktop performance - blame the drivers.

                have you tried manjaro gnome running on wayland? i'm asking because i'm considering getting Pi 400 myself.


                Originally posted by anarsoul View Post

                Oh, that's easy. Most of modern ARM SBCs have a fraction of memory bandwidth of 10yo x86 systems.
                Pi 400 has LPDDR4-3200, didn't check Pi 4, likely the same.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DebianLinuxero View Post
                  I have a Raspberry PI 4b 4GB.
                  I don't talk about games. I talk about simple desktop use.

                  And I don't understand how this machine was announced as capable of 4K video playback.
                  One of the reasons for poor video playback performance as far as I know is that the hardware video decoder kernel drivers + user space to use it are lacking, hardware vendors care more for Android than mainline Linux... on the 3D/2D side, the mesa drivers need more optimizations. Lastly thermals, the RPI if used for more heavy tasks as desktop usage would need a cooling solution to keep it from throttling because excessive heat will downclock your CPU making the system feel sluggish.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by unic0rn View Post

                    Pi 400 has LPDDR4-3200, didn't check Pi 4, likely the same.
                    Yeah, but its width is 32 bit. On x86 a single channel is 64 bit, and you get 128 bit in dual-channel mode.

                    Comment

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