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  • #11
    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
    Annoyingly my main reason to use a VM to play games is to run older platforms (If I want to play current games, why virtualize?). However I doubt VMware will be backporting their fancy new SVGAv3 system to Windows 9x any time soon
    To have a Unicorn Gaming PC. One that runs a Linux or BSD Desktop and can fire up any virtualized environment to play any game. I don't think we'd want that for competitive use. Bare metal probably has better input latency, frame timings, and all that...and probably Windows over Wine. If Linux/Wine had better numbers/benchmarks I imagine we'd hear about all the top pro gamers custom Linux setups.

    So I discovered Rocket League two days ago. Rings and the custom map loader here I come.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
      I hope so as well.

      Michael did you ever benchmark this? I would be interested to know how it compares to something like VirGL.
      I've just started with virgl and so far it works pretty good for me. Can use multiple VMs with opengl accel without needing gpu pass through!

      Guests need virtio-gpu, and it seems lost Linux distros have support by default!

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      • #13
        Originally posted by S.Pam View Post

        I've just started with virgl and so far it works pretty good for me. Can use multiple VMs with opengl accel without needing gpu pass through!

        Guests need virtio-gpu, and it seems lost Linux distros have support by default!
        The main issue I have with virgl is the lack of spice support over tcp: it only works through a unix socket, which rules out using a remote server.
        ## VGA ##
        AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
        Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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        • #14
          Originally posted by darkbasic View Post

          The main issue I have with virgl is the lack of spice support over tcp: it only works through a unix socket, which rules out using a remote server.
          Not at all. I run it over tcp. It's just a limit of virt-manager GUI, not libvirt or qemu.

          Here, running virt-view from a Windows client. https://paste.tnonline.net/files/UPU...-05_183523.png

          To add spice with OpenGL/VirGL support you have to replace the graphics section in the VM definition with the following code. Use virsh from a shell to do it.
          #virsh edit fedora34:
          Code:
          <graphics type='spice' autoport='yes' listen='192.168.0.1'>
             <listen type='address' address='192.168.0.1'/>
             <image compression='auto_glz'/>
             <streaming mode='filter'/>
             <clipboard copypaste='yes'/>
             <filetransfer enable='yes'/>
          </graphics>
          <graphics type='egl-headless'>
             <gl rendernode='/dev/dri/renderD128'/>
          </graphics>
          This brings both AUDIO and VIDEO to the Spice client
          Last edited by S.Pam; 05 May 2021, 12:43 PM.

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          • #15
            It works with SuperTuxCart!

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            • #16
              Originally posted by xxmitsu View Post
              Hope VMware won't forget about opensourcing their D3D10/11 state tracker..

              it is dead code as besides nouveau and svga no driver tries to handle it and there is simply now way to generate a TGSI with those anyway.

              6 hours from this comment, its still being worked on.

              I've started working on it. I got meson to build -- it wasn't too hard. I hope to get it done over the next couple days.

              Just need to update copyright, go through an internal review, then I'll push to FDO. There's one snafu: the code depends upon Microsoft WDK headers. I've been bundling them for convenience, but it's not a good idea to merge like that, so we'll need to figure out a way consume WDK headers out of tree. But that can be addressed once it's out in the public.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                To have a Unicorn Gaming PC. One that runs a Linux or BSD Desktop and can fire up any virtualized environment to play any game. I don't think we'd want that for competitive use. Bare metal probably has better input latency, frame timings, and all that...and probably Windows over Wine. If Linux/Wine had better numbers/benchmarks I imagine we'd hear about all the top pro gamers custom Linux setups.

                So I discovered Rocket League two days ago. Rings and the custom map loader here I come.
                I can't say much for latency, but performance hit for VM gaming is minimal, I have very little issues on this point. but no sane pro gamer would risk a ban trying to do VM gaming now. it was picking up steam, but battleye ended that really quickly. but I personally use linux for all my retro gaming needs.

                Gamescope is a godsend. even the stupidest of games can have good scaling. which is taken for granted in a DX world. Playing games that make direct calls to Win32GDI for rendering and getting good upscaling is... not fun.

                So far there are two programs, one forces the sin of using xBRZ, and another is true integer scaling, which isn't great unless you like a large box. Gamescope though does Nearest neighbor (though it calls it integer scaling). making it so easy to play retro games. Though I say retro, there are some newer games that do that too.
                Last edited by Quackdoc; 05 May 2021, 02:50 PM. Reason: Correction

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                  I can't say much for latency, but performance hit for VM gaming is minimal, I have very little issues on this point. but no sane pro gamer would risk a ban trying to do VM gaming now. it was picking up steam, but battleye ended that really quickly. but I personally use linux for all my retro gaming needs.
                  Which sucks. It'd be nice to have a single machine that covered most every game or platform. Like you , for me that's basically Linux outside of online/competitive Windows games.

                  Gamescope is a godsend. even the stupidest of games can have good scaling. which is taken for granted in a DX world. Playing games that make direct calls to Win32GDI for rendering and getting good upscaling is... not fun.

                  So far there are two programs, one forces the sin of using xBRZ, and another is true integer scaling, which isn't great unless you like a large box. Gamescope though does Nearest neighbor (though it calls it integer scaling). making it so easy to play retro games. Though I say retro, there are some newer games that do that too.
                  It really is. I consider that a necessary to have feature in the age of 4K. Luckily a lot of older hardware resolutions scale into 4K or very close to it. Between that and the awesome border art community retro gaming has never been better.

                  I also do what Gamescope does with the AMD Control Panel on Windows due to having a 4K monitor and an RX 580. I basically run everything at 1080p and have integer scaling bump that up to 4K. No black border

                  IMHO, 1080p60 Ultra scaled up to 4K is better than a native 4K30 Medium. I actually prefer that to using in-game scaling tools. AC Origins, for example, gets this odd texture shimmer when lowering the in-game scaling too much and it still runs like crap (45fps with occasional skipping) whereas I can set it to 1080p with 120% in-game scaling and have AMD upscale that to 4K and run at a smooth 60fps....although the AMD Control Panel always reports 55 FPS...

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                    To have a Unicorn Gaming PC. One that runs a Linux or BSD Desktop and can fire up any virtualized environment to play any game. I don't think we'd want that for competitive use. Bare metal probably has better input latency, frame timings, and all that...and probably Windows over Wine. If Linux/Wine had better numbers/benchmarks I imagine we'd hear about all the top pro gamers custom Linux setups.

                    So I discovered Rocket League two days ago. Rings and the custom map loader here I come.
                    Not the person you're replying to, but here's my rationale.

                    Period hardware is only going to get more rare and prone to breaking over time. If I set up a system based on emulation on top of commodity hardware, it's much easier to feel comfortable that the same childhood floppy disks from the early 90s that I imaged and emulate now will still give me the same quality of experience under emulation another 25-30 years down the road. (As long as I run them inside an open-source emulator/translation layer on top of an open-source operating system to ensure maximum maintainability and portability.)

                    I'd much rather build a purpose-specific Linux box for competitive use, just in pursuit of that "what I experience now, I can archive" element. (Not that I meet other people's definition of playing competitively, so that helps.)
                    Last edited by ssokolow; 05 May 2021, 03:57 PM.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

                      If I set up a system based on emulation on top of commodity hardware, it's much easier to feel comfortable that the same childhood floppy disks from the early 90s that I imaged and emulate now will still give me the same quality of experience under emulation another 25-30 years down the road. (As long as I run them inside an open-source emulator/translation layer on top of an open-source operating system to ensure maximum maintainability and portability.)
                      Don't be so sure. I upgraded the CPU in my server about a year ago and none of the VMs would boot as the existing Virtual CPUs weren't compatible with the new real CPU. Dropping the existing virtual CPUs and adding them back in got me going again but the new virtual CPUs had different instructions than the old ones. Agreed you have a better chance in a virtual environment. But it isn't guaranteed.

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