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Mesa 21.0 Is Now Working With Haiku OS For Software OpenGL Rendering

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  • Mesa 21.0 Is Now Working With Haiku OS For Software OpenGL Rendering

    Phoronix: Mesa 21.0 Is Now Working With Haiku OS For Software OpenGL Rendering

    BeOS-inspired Haiku OS can now run with Mesa 21.0 well using the latest development code...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-With-Haiku-OS

  • #2
    This is amazing.
    If the experimental multi user code gets a little bit more mature, Haiku could actually be an alternative OS for modern hardware.
    Go Haiku!!!

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    • #3
      It's been over a decade since porting Gallium and still no hardware-accelerated 3D rendering?

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      • #4
        Is Haiku better than Linux?
        Does it have higher performance, cleaner interface, a more robust security model?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          Is Haiku better than Linux?
          Does it have higher performance, cleaner interface, a more robust security model?
          Haiku is very fast. "Cleaner" interface is up for debate. It has unique interface that's a bit different (although still similar) to most other modern GUIs.

          https://www.haiku-os.org/docs/userguide/en/gui.html

          Some of the most interesting things are the "Tabbed" interface, where you can have multiple applications share the same window, and switch between tabs. Another interesting feature is the ability to "glue" applications side-by-side to each other. So they will all move and minimize with each other. I'm not sure how useful all of these things are to John Q Public, but they would be invaluable to powerusers and developers.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AmericanLocomotive View Post
            Haiku is very fast. "Cleaner" interface is up for debate. It has unique interface that's a bit different (although still similar) to most other modern GUIs.

            https://www.haiku-os.org/docs/userguide/en/gui.html

            Some of the most interesting things are the "Tabbed" interface, where you can have multiple applications share the same window, and switch between tabs. Another interesting feature is the ability to "glue" applications side-by-side to each other. So they will all move and minimize with each other. I'm not sure how useful all of these things are to John Q Public, but they would be invaluable to powerusers and developers.
            Oh, by interface I didn't mean user interface, I meant like the API, the exposed system functions.

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            • #7
              Typo:

              Originally posted by phoronix View Post
              A number of patches worked on for Haiu OS

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              • #8
                Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                BeOS-inspired Haiku OS
                Maybe it's just me, but this sentence in every Haiku news is just outdated. Haiku is now 19 years old, it's like in every Linux news in 2012 write "Minix/UNIX inspired Linux" — while true is not relevant anymore.

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                • #9
                  Many years ago, the conceptually most interesting feature i saw is the file system that allows you to tag files with keywords. However, it was recommended to not use that too much because it would become slow. And at least at the time it was really buggy and forgot all tags quite reliably.... So not sure what it’s actually worth it/if it’s still a thing. For me, that’s all too heavily button based and is orthogonal to what I consider efficient for work or anything.


                  @mykolak: So they are not stuck with GCC 3 anymore because they want to be able to compile ancient beos software or something along these lines?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kemosabe View Post
                    Many years ago, the conceptually most interesting feature i saw is the file system that allows you to tag files with keywords. However, it was recommended to not use that too much because it would become slow. And at least at the time it was really buggy and forgot all tags quite reliably.... So not sure what it’s actually worth it/if it’s still a thing. For me, that’s all too heavily button based and is orthogonal to what I consider efficient for work or anything.


                    @mykolak: So they are not stuck with GCC 3 anymore because they want to be able to compile ancient beos software or something along these lines?
                    edit: They do have plans to switch to gcc8.
                    Last edited by CTown; 10 January 2021, 02:39 PM.

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