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Mesa 20.2 Aiming For Release Next Week As Big Advancement For Open-Source GPU Drivers

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  • Mesa 20.2 Aiming For Release Next Week As Big Advancement For Open-Source GPU Drivers

    Phoronix: Mesa 20.2 Aiming For Release Next Week As Big Advancement For Open-Source GPU Drivers

    The fourth and likely last release candidate of Mesa 20.2 is now available for testing while the formal release should happen next week...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...2-RC4-Released

  • #2
    Nothing for lima or panfrost?

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    • #3
      For over 10 months now I use Linux as my main operating system (mainly for coding, text processing, multimedia and gaming) and the need to boot my secondary Windows installation grows smaller on a monthly basis. In fact, I only need to use Windows once every two months or so. Therefore a big thanks to everyone who works so hard for improving the Linux graphics drivers.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kiffmet View Post
        For over 10 months now I use Linux as my main operating system (mainly for coding, text processing, multimedia and gaming) and the need to boot my secondary Windows installation grows smaller on a monthly basis. In fact, I only need to use Windows once every two months or so. Therefore a big thanks to everyone who works so hard for improving the Linux graphics drivers.
        Its a beautiful time to be involved in Linux. 10 years ago it would have been a struggle to run Linux as your primary system.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wizard69 View Post

          Its a beautiful time to be involved in Linux. 10 years ago it would have been a struggle to run Linux as your primary system.
          10 years ago was awesome and great .

          9 years ago is when the struggle started. GNOME 2 became GNOME 3 along with the GTK 2 to 3 transition and the whole CSD/SSD debacle starting up . After that I had a couple of good years with the last of XFCE and GTK 2 until finally moving over to Plasma somewhere around its 5.4 or 5.5 release.

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          • #6
            We'll see how it goes, setting ACO as the default for RADV made it extra buggy

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tvashtar View Post
              We'll see how it goes, setting ACO as the default for RADV made it extra buggy
              Do you have any specific issues you're concerned about?

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              • #8
                Even though I was on ACO beforehand, this mesa release (rc2) proved to show a 5% performance improvement in ACC for me.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tvashtar View Post
                  We'll see how it goes, setting ACO as the default for RADV made it extra buggy
                  Do you have any specific instances? This was my assumption too, but I switched over a few months ago to test, and I haven't found a single thing that worked with LLVM RADV that doesn't work in ACO (yet). Shader runtime performance has been pretty much the same, but the shader compile time difference is actually noticeable on the first run-through.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                    Its a beautiful time to be involved in Linux. 10 years ago it would have been a struggle to run Linux as your primary system.
                    Meh, it's all relative. I've been running Linux as my primary desktop system since 1997. Slackware 3.2 on a *dual* Pentium 133 Mhz board, Matrox PCI graphics, 3DFX voodoo. First FVWM, then the newly released WindowMaker, and Enlightenment were my WM's of choice. Id Software released Linux binaries for GLquake that used the 3DFX board, it was awesome. StarOffice 4.0 allowed me to read/write the MS Office file formats for my university coursework. XMMS and RealPlayer provided many enjoyable hours of MP3 and streaming, plus it was the Napster heyday. 1997 was a really great year to make the switch to Linux.

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