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Microsoft Doubles Their Commits To Mesa This Week

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  • Microsoft Doubles Their Commits To Mesa This Week

    Phoronix: Microsoft Doubles Their Commits To Mesa This Week

    More than a dozen patches were merged by a Microsoft engineer into Mesa yesterday...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...s-Mesa-Commits

  • #2
    Will this be helpful in any way for Linux users or it's for Windows 10 users only ?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
      Will this be helpful in any way for Linux users or it's for Windows 10 users only ?
      It improves OpenCL support through SPIR-V inside mesa, so clover will benefits from all of this.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by karolherbst View Post

        It improves OpenCL support through SPIR-V inside mesa, so clover will benefits from all of this.
        OpenCL can work with mesa ?
        Then why does AMD forces me to install their proprietary driver if I want to use it ?
        I am confused...

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        • #5
          Speaking of Mesa, Windows 10 and drivers, the Renoir Pro (Ryzen 4000 series) APUs started to appear on the Asian market by some retailer, despite AMD's intention to only sell those for OEMs.

          And the benchmarks started to appear on a couple YT channels that got their hands on the chips. Apparently big name channels are afraid to touch them, but that didn't stop a couple of small ones to buy the chips and start benchmarking on Windows 10. After watching a bunch of them, here is the gist:

          - If you were spectating a console level performance (XBox X or PS4 Pro), you'll be disappointed. As per AMD's own documentation, the R7 4750G GPU is barely faster (~10%) than the older R5 3400G;
          - The difference in performance between the quad-core R3 and the octa-core R7 is more or less 10 FPS on most games;
          - Comparing with entry level discrete cards, they are about the same performance of a GT1030 or a RX 550;
          - It is clear that Renoir was about performance per watt, since the Vega GPU got reduced in size and overclocked. The marginal gain in performance can be attributed to IPC gains on the Zen 2 CPU compared to Zen+ from the older generation;
          - Gains in overclocking and memory speed above 3200 are minimal.

          If you want to see for yourself, here one of the channels with a extensive cover on the matter:

          https://www.youtube.com/c/TechEpiphany/videos

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          • #6
            Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
            ...the Renoir Pro (Ryzen 4000 series) APUs started to appear on the Asian market by some retailer, despite AMD's intention to only sell those for OEMs.
            Not only Asia: https://geizhals.de/amd-ryzen-5-pro-...html#offerlist mindfactory (germany - our Newegg) among them. A rather large retailer and once in a while used to asses amd/inte/nvidia marketshares in diy pc fields.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post

              OpenCL can work with mesa ?
              Then why does AMD forces me to install their proprietary driver if I want to use it ?
              I am confused...
              they don't? Even ROCm is open source and doesn't require a proprietary driver.

              But yeah, Mesa has limited OpenCL support, it's just not that great at the moment.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                - If you were spectating a console level performance (XBox X or PS4 Pro), you'll be disappointed. As per AMD's own documentation, the R7 4750G GPU is barely faster (~10%) than the older R5 3400G;
                - The difference in performance between the quad-core R3 and the octa-core R7 is more or less 10 FPS on most games;
                - Comparing with entry level discrete cards, they are about the same performance of a GT1030 or a RX 550;
                - It is clear that Renoir was about performance per watt, since the Vega GPU got reduced in size and overclocked. The marginal gain in performance can be attributed to IPC gains on the Zen 2 CPU compared to Zen+ from the older generation;
                - Gains in overclocking and memory speed above 3200 are minimal.
                That performance is exactly about what I was expecting. I think they'll be great little buggers for desktops since the APU portion looks to be plenty capable of running desktop environments and most day-to-day applications so we can slap in a better GPU, possibly in conjunction with a VM, to run our more intensive applications in a safe and secure environment. And, yes, I'm thinking games there, but moving the Game Clients and other programs possibly tied to credit card/bank information into a safe and secure environment is a big part of computing from VMs. Plus that setup allows the ability to use less power since we'd only be using the power-hungry GPU when we need it instead of all the time. And when native and for the games that support it, DX12 and Vulkan have those multi-GPU modes so maybe the APU+GPU could be better than just the GPU...we all know how that wishful thinking usually goes, but it's worth mentioning none-the-less.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
                  Will this be helpful in any way for Linux users or it's for Windows 10 users only ?
                  Its for users that Windows 10 and want Linux in a HyperV environment with Hardware Acceleration. But currently they target OpenCL/Compute Support.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                    Speaking of Mesa, Windows 10 and drivers, the Renoir Pro (Ryzen 4000 series) APUs started to appear on the Asian market by some retailer, despite AMD's intention to only sell those for OEMs.
                    Wow that was fast. To get older gen Ryzen Pro from "secondary" channels like that I had to wait 6 months or so from release.

                    Very good, it means some retailers are seeing the $$$ opportunity and placed an order for trays in bulk before the release. The "we sell only to OEMs" means that they don't provide the box and stuff, and only accept B2B transactions for a relatively large batch of CPU trays, they don't actually care if the buyer is an OEM or a retailer. Once the orders from their "best buddies" (HP, Dell, Lenovo and other major OEMs) are fulfilled, anyway.

                    If you were spectating a console level performance (XBox X or PS4 Pro)
                    In what world can the GPU of a 65W APU compete with the GPU of a 300W playstation 4 pro? I mean, one man can hope, but it wasn't exactly plausible to expect that, the PS4P has like 200W more thermal budget.

                    The CPU is probably miles better though.

                    It is clear that Renoir was about performance per watt,
                    exactly how we like it. The main target for the Ryzen 4000 APUs are slim PCs and small-form-factor devices, as it's supposed to take on Intel in the mini-PC market too.

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