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OpenGL 4.5 Now Enabled For LLVMpipe With Mesa 20.3, To Be Back-Ported For 20.2

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  • OpenGL 4.5 Now Enabled For LLVMpipe With Mesa 20.3, To Be Back-Ported For 20.2

    Phoronix: OpenGL 4.5 Now Enabled For LLVMpipe With Mesa 20.3, To Be Back-Ported For 20.2

    It landed sooner than anticipated but the LLVMpipe patches enabling OpenGL 4.5 support were merged to Mesa 20.3-devel today and are also marked for back-porting to the Mesa 20.2 series soon to be promoted to stable...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...LLVMpipe-Lands

  • #2
    What's the override to force software rendering to test this out?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
      What's the override to force software rendering to test this out?
      Code:
      MESA_LOADER_DRIVER_OVERRIDE=llvmpipe
      Same works for zink:
      Code:
      MESA_LOADER_DRIVER_OVERRIDE=zink

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      • #4
        I have wondered idly if video outputs will begin appearing on server boards. With the increasing computational power of the new many-core CPUs, and software like this and Zink, it seems you could now reasonably do low-intensity or infrequent video with no GPU at all if you wished.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Teggs View Post
          I have wondered idly if video outputs will begin appearing on server boards. With the increasing computational power of the new many-core CPUs, and software like this and Zink, it seems you could now reasonably do low-intensity or infrequent video with no GPU at all if you wished.
          You still need a way to get the signal out, so a chip has to be there. If I'm not mistaken, a ancient Matrox GPU model is the weapon of choice for a lot of server boards. Its Linux kernel driver was even updated a couple months ago.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
            You still need a way to get the signal out, so a chip has to be there.
            you also need monitor to get signal into. there are usb videocards and there are usb or wifi-connectable monitors

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            • #7
              llvmpipe already pushed r600 out of top 5
              and it's catching up with nvc0

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              • #8
                Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

                You still need a way to get the signal out, so a chip has to be there. If I'm not mistaken, a ancient Matrox GPU model is the weapon of choice for a lot of server boards. Its Linux kernel driver was even updated a couple months ago.
                Keep in mins that most servers are usually accessed remotely via ipmi / iDrac / ILO, so getting the signal out is rarely a problem...
                Devel: Intel S2600C0, 2xE5-2658V2, 32GB, 6x2TB, 1x256GB-SSD, GTX1080, F32, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
                oVirt: Intel S2400GP2, 2xE5-2448L, 96GB, 10x2TB, GTX550, CentOS8.1.
                Win10: Gigabyte B85M-HD3, E3-1245V3, 32GB, 5x1TB, GTX980, Win10Pro.
                Devel-2: Asus H110M-K, i5-6500, 16GB, 3x1TB + 128GB-SSD, F32, Dell U2711.
                Laptop: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F32.

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