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LLVMpipe Now Exposes OpenGL 4.2 For GL On CPUs

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  • DanL
    replied
    Originally posted by markg85 View Post
    In total just 5 more extensions to be fully up to date with the latest OpenGL.
    Looking at the number of extensions doesn't give you a good picture. Some extensions require a lot more work than others (as Michael points out).

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  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Michael It would be nice to benchmark Tomb Raider on a many-core Threadripper once LLVMpipe is mature enough. An AMD EPYC CPU with twice the memory channels of Threadripper might be better suited for this task, unless there are thread scheduling issues.

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
    This obviously makes sense. However I would actually love to see a graph showing where a CPU does start to overtake GPU.

    For example which generation CPU started to yield better performance than the GMA 945? We are surely able to see some crossover now. It would also be useful to see how far away we are from reaching modern GPU performance via a CPU.
    Since for GPUs the "muh singlethred puhfomance" argument never applied, even when CPUs hit a brick wall and Moore's Law died (somewhere in the Sandy/Ivybridge era) GPUs have kept increasing their performance each generation at more or less the same speed.
    This is also valid for iGPUs, where in the GMA era it was complete trash and only ancient or very basic games could run, while in the post Ivybridge era (HD4000 and later) you really could play modern games (not AAA titles obviously) on it.

    So I would expect some kind of parabolic graph where the farther we go in time the bigger the distance from CPU and GPU gets.

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  • kpedersen
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    as a general rule, any CPU of any generation with LLVMpipe is worse than its own generation's GPUs.
    This obviously makes sense. However I would actually love to see a graph showing where a CPU does start to overtake GPU.

    For example which generation CPU started to yield better performance than the GMA 945? We are surely able to see some crossover now. It would also be useful to see how far away we are from reaching modern GPU performance via a CPU.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    No chance. Gen7 era CPUs would be worse with LLVMpipe than Gen7 GPUs.
    as a general rule, any CPU of any generation with LLVMpipe is worse than its own generation's GPUs.

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  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Aryma View Post
    this may work better than i965 for old 7gen ?
    No chance. Gen7 era CPUs would be worse with LLVMpipe than Gen7 GPUs.

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  • Aryma
    replied
    this may work better than i965 for old 7gen ?

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  • imirkin
    replied
    Originally posted by LinAGKar View Post
    Except there are 11 items required for OpenGL ES 3.1.
    With a handful of trivial exceptions, ES 3.1 is a subset of GL 4.3 or so. (It adds atomic exchange support for float images, primitive bounding box which can be a no-op impl, stuff like that.)

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  • LinAGKar
    replied
    Except there are 11 items required for OpenGL ES 3.1.

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by cRaZy-bisCuiT View Post
    Is it? I mean... in which case does software rendering OpenGL make sense? Isn't that too slow anyway?
    it's useful only as a fallback for work applications (where actually seeing anything is enough to do conversions or migrate to something else) and very legacy stuff that isn't going to use OpenGL 4 anyway

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