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Microsoft Announces Direct3D 12 For Linux / WSL2

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  • Azrael5
    replied
    I hope that Micrisoft will accomplish an Nvidia driver able to play Wayland graphical API.

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  • SystemCrasher
    replied
    I wonder when exactly MS would ditch their NT kernel and declare they're going to use Linux as OS kernel instead. Seems they're prepping for transition hell a lot already?! O_O

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  • pracedru
    replied
    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

    There is no fear. Microsoft does NOT OWN the Linux kernel. But they can use it with their walled garden userland if they so choose. There is nothing wrong with that. As long as they contribute back to the kernel, i see no reason for people to be upset. It is not like Windows 10 is opensource...
    I agree.

    Leave a comment:


  • skierpage
    replied
    Originally posted by bezirg View Post
    So what is there to benefit for us the (native) Linux users? Can we use this library to develop native-linux d3d apps? Or is this only going to work for wsl2-linux-in-vm users ? If it is only the latter, then we have reached indeed the "extend" phase of "embrace-extend-extinquish".
    Microsoft developer Sasha Levin on dri-devel:

    "The plan is for Microsoft to provide shims to allow the existing Linux userspace interact with DX12; I'll explain below why we had to pipe DX12 all the way into the Linux guest, but this is *not* to introduce DX12 into the Linux world as competition. There is no intent for anyone in the Linux world to start coding for the DX12 API. "

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  • lucrus
    replied
    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

    Worrying news for what reason?
    Because they are trying to muddy the waters and they're likely to have success. Most people will come to believe Windows is free as in free-speech, because it is Linux-based, and it is safe to use, for the same reason. Safer than Linux itself, because it's backed by MS. The same happened back in the first Mac OSX times. MS will damage our disclosure work and make us look like strange heretics who only want to wage war, once again.

    Most people will believe MS, because they have much greater advertising power than we have. And we will be forced to have to deal with MS formats and protocols for another 40 years to come. Seems to me more than enough to be worried about.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thaodan
    replied
    Originally posted by zxy_thf View Post
    Guys.
    Could you image 10 years ago I had to install acrobat on Linux to read PDFs smoothly, but nowadays I'm wishing evince on Windows just because the Acrobat reader s**ks in every way except for a few corner cases (e.g., DRM)

    They are LOSING advantages on desktop.
    Qkular is aviable for windows. Its the same as evince but with Qt.

    Leave a comment:


  • duby229
    replied
    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

    Every point apart from the last one is false and a filesystem being slow is hardly a reason to entirely move to another OS.

    The only people I see moving to Linux are developers coming from MacOS because they got fed up with Mac for some reason (crappy hardware and the MacOS going to shit).
    Well, for the last like 6 or so years, Web development has shifted almost completely from Windows to Linux. I think that shift has been largely complete now, but it was enormous.

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  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by JustinTurdeau View Post

    Found the Microsoft shill.
    Try again.

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  • JustinTurdeau
    replied
    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
    Every point apart from the last one is false
    Found the Microsoft shill.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Steve Pronovost
    We have consider the possibility of bringing DX to Linux with no Windows cord attached. I'm not ready to discuss this at this time 😊... but in the hypothetical that we were do this, DX would be running on top of DRI/DRM on native Linux. We likely would be contributing some changes to DRM to address area of divergence and get better mapping for our user mode driver, but we wouldn't try to shoehorn /dev/dxg into the picture. In that hypothetical world, we would essentially have DX target DRM on native Linux and DX continue to target DXG in WSL to share the GPU with the host. I think this further reinforce the point you guys were making that the right place for our current dxgkrnl driver to live in would be /drivers/hyperv/dxgkrnl. In insight, I totally agree 😊.
    It's been around 18 hours. Has enough time passed

    Leave a comment:

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