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Systemd-homed: Systemd Now Working To Improve Home Directory Handling

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  • Alliancemd
    replied
    Sounds like another nice feature that people will hate on...
    Go systemd, give me relocatable home directories, make backup simple

    Leave a comment:


  • AsuMagic
    replied
    I've got to admit I didn't expect a systemd thread to derail into a Portal shitpost.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Djhg2000 View Post
    One picosecond is plenty of time for an AI at the scale of GLaDOS to forget why it's doing what it's doing.
    Dunno, I sometimes also forget why I'm doing what I'm doing, but I don't descend into homicidal maniac mode and start killing off everyone in range.

    Also, the ability to lie to secure neurotoxin to then use to kill off the scientists does establish causality links. That's a plan it set in motion, it's not a mistake, it's not random.

    Leave a comment:


  • Djhg2000
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Glados was always trying to kill them "within one picosecond of its activation" as said in the game, killed off a bunch of people in a few incidents, and then learned to lie and the scientists believed its lies and gave it the neurotoxin it used to kill them all and take control of the facility. https://half-life.fandom.com/wiki/GLaDOS

    I would call your comparison invalid, as such.
    One picosecond is plenty of time for an AI at the scale of GLaDOS to forget why it's doing what it's doing.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Djhg2000 View Post
    Gnome
    Linux
    and
    systemD
    Operating
    System

    It sounds like a neat concept but we all know why it's a fatal combination.

    (Explanation and spoiler for the game Portal: GLaDOS is a sentient AI which got so obsessed with carrying out its tasks that it forgot about the scientists it was running them for, killing them all in the process.)
    Glados was always trying to kill them "within one picosecond of its activation" as said in the game, killed off a bunch of people in a few incidents, and then learned to lie and the scientists believed its lies and gave it the neurotoxin it used to kill them all and take control of the facility. https://half-life.fandom.com/wiki/GLaDOS

    I would call your comparison invalid, as such.

    Leave a comment:


  • intelfx
    replied
    Originally posted by polarathene View Post

    Is this sort of thing possible to use with Flatpak apps?
    As it stands now, all desktop applications get hit by exactly the limitation I described. Long story short, you would have to checkpoint the app together with the X server (or Wayland compositor) — and, by extension, every other app that's connected to the same X server/Wayland compositor (same principle, but in reverse). DBus doesn't exactly help, either.

    For this to work, CRIU would need to learn to extract X11/Wayland state from the display server/compositor (and inject it back upon process restoration), which is much easier said than done.
    Last edited by intelfx; 23 September 2019, 09:32 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • polarathene
    replied
    Originally posted by intelfx View Post
    (Source: briefly worked on CRIU)
    Oh, CRIU! Yeah that's the one Cool that you worked on it. Is this sort of thing possible to use with Flatpak apps?

    Leave a comment:


  • Djhg2000
    replied
    Gnome
    Linux
    and
    systemD
    Operating
    System

    It sounds like a neat concept but we all know why it's a fatal combination.

    (Explanation and spoiler for the game Portal: GLaDOS is a sentient AI which got so obsessed with carrying out its tasks that it forgot about the scientists it was running them for, killing them all in the process.)

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    All of your usual user program configuration files, password lists, etc will become stored on an encrypted loopback image making it so we should, in theory, be able to take that image from OS to OS to OS and have all our user settings and whatnot intact and working. That assumes that all those OSs have the same programs installed...

    But, disregard the OS hopping scenario, it would be really useful for OS upgrades, assist distribution maintainers with migrating to having a read-only root and using atomic updates since it attempts to move some of the files end users have to tweak under /etc to the user image, in corporate environments where every PC has the same crap installed all we'd have to do is load our image from a network drive so any PC in those environments could be used by anyone and have our personalized tweaks, sudo password, GPG keys, etc.
    Well if you just put your favourite Linux distro on a flash drive, with encrypted partitions, problem solved. You don't have to depend on Linux with systemd and all of the programs you want being present, you can just guarantee it with that flash drive.

    But yeah, it does look like a useful solution for people who multi-boot and/or distro hop.

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by frank007 View Post

    You really dont know what software is.
    So you think that disk firmware, kernel, driver code and user-space applications is hardware? So please enlighten me dear master what your definition of software is!

    Leave a comment:

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