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Mesa 19.2 Is Just Six Patches Away From Seeing OpenGL 4.6 Support

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  • #11
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    Don't get too , because in a lot of cases, when one brand adds something to Mesa, it's not uncommon for the other to follow shortly after. Being open-source, I'm sure AMD could mooch off of most of the existing code. Besides... not like there's a lot cases where we're all waiting for 4.6 anyway. I personally don't know of anything that depends on it.
    Fore sure, all have noticed this:

    https://mesamatrix.net/
    OpenGL 4.6 - GLSL 4.60
    GL_ARB_gl_spirv and GL_ARB_spirv_extensions

    in progress (Nicolai Hähnle (AMD) and Ian Romanick (Intel))

    So chances are high for Radeonsi, too. Even that Nicolai was heavy involved with Navi bring up (internal stuff lately).

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    • #12
      I would like to see some cool demos that utilize modern technology such as Vulkan, OpenGL 4.6, tessellation, ray tracing, etc.
      So that we can see what is possible with computers in 2019, and what is possible with Linux.

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      • #13
        Down to 1 patch that actually changes logic, which is causing a regression. The other 5 just update docs and enable the extensions.

        Expect radeonsi to enable it soon, on the NIR backend. I'd expect the TGSI backend to remain the default (at 4.5) for at least the next mesa release though.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          I would like to see some cool demos that utilize modern technology such as Vulkan, OpenGL 4.6, tessellation, ray tracing, etc.
          So that we can see what is possible with computers in 2019, and what is possible with Linux.
          There are some. However, they are mostly closed-source.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by treba View Post
            Can applications then load spirv shaders instead of glsl, requiering less shader compilation?
            spirv still has to be compiled to native code. so it will be less, but not by much(still every single bit helps)
            Last edited by pal666; 18 July 2019, 03:49 PM.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by microcode View Post

              Yeah, basically; it also means that if the publisher of the software is feeling lucky, they'll ship only SPIR-V shaders for both a Vulkan and a GL renderer; though it seems to me that platforms with working OpenGL 4.6 drivers will tend to have working Vulkan drivers as well. Maybe it was intended as a transitional feature, to allow people to start using SPIR-V toolchains before implementing a Vulkan renderer.
              I believe one of the major intended benefits is for people who write HLSL shaders and then port them to OpenGL - such as Valve. Supposedly SPIR-V should make that process simpler and more automatable. Though now that Vulkan is taking off I think the impact of apps wanting to support OpenGL (but only version 4.6) won't be that high. Maybe workstation apps will take advantage of it more than games.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

                I believe one of the major intended benefits is for people who write HLSL shaders and then port them to OpenGL - such as Valve. Supposedly SPIR-V should make that process simpler and more automatable. Though now that Vulkan is taking off I think the impact of apps wanting to support OpenGL (but only version 4.6) won't be that high. Maybe workstation apps will take advantage of it more than games.
                Yeah, I was thinking about that. Just not sure there are many reasons to do it with GL rather than Vulkan, if you're rolling your own brand new compat layer targeting SPIR-V. :- P

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