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  • #21
    Originally posted by blackiwid View Post
    So how difficult it is you cant know because you did not have to do it, because you had 64bit uefi.
    Like I said, the Baytrail laptop has 32bit UEFI, it's the netbook that has 64bit UEFI. Yes, I have two Baytrail machines here. And it wasn't hard at all regarding the laptop, at least for me who knows how to roll one's own LiveUSB. However, it's a laptop, so pretty much standard hardware in it when it comes to wifi and audio and such. Tablets are quite different, more on that bellow.

    Originally posted by blackiwid View Post
    And there is just no reason except dumbness or that they get payed from microsoft doing that
    Please, let's stick to technical stuff, conspiracy theories are just uber stupid. Yes, there *are* other reasons. Tablets are considered "embedded" hardware. With this come various differences to "standard" hardware, such as peripherals (wifi, audio) being attached to SDIO instead of PCI, which means different methods to enumerate and access them. And various other platform-specific stuff, for example to deal with hardware appearing and disappearing at any moment (think tablet/laptop hybrid) or to deal with tablets being "always-on" devices (so special considerations when it comes to power saving).

    Originally posted by blackiwid View Post
    having problems with resolutions/batlife/input
    That's a matter of drivers. Linux is a bit behind here (I'm talking upstream kernel here, not for example Android kernels), but that's a Linux problem. Sure this problem might come from lack of standardization in the embedded space and/or lack of documentation from hardware vendors. But it's nevertheless more of a Linux problem, rather than something inherent in tablets.

    Of course, because of all the above I went for a classic netbook instead of a tablet or hybrid. My point isn't that things are peachy, my point is don't throw conspiracy theories at Intel or outright dismiss them as the "bad guys" who make crappy hardware, but rather try to actually understand the problem space.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Gusar View Post
      Like I said, the Baytrail laptop has 32bit UEFI, it's the netbook that has 64bit UEFI. Yes, I have two Baytrail machines here. And it wasn't hard at all regarding the laptop, at least for me who knows how to roll one's own LiveUSB. However, it's a laptop, so pretty much standard hardware in it when it comes to wifi and audio and such. Tablets are quite different, more on that bellow.

      Please, let's stick to technical stuff, conspiracy theories are just uber stupid. Yes, there *are* other reasons. Tablets are considered "embedded" hardware. With this come various differences to "standard" hardware, such as peripherals (wifi, audio) being attached to SDIO instead of PCI, which means different methods to enumerate and access them. And various other platform-specific stuff, for example to deal with hardware appearing and disappearing at any moment (think tablet/laptop hybrid) or to deal with tablets being "always-on" devices (so special considerations when it comes to power saving).

      That's a matter of drivers. Linux is a bit behind here (I'm talking upstream kernel here, not for example Android kernels), but that's a Linux problem. Sure this problem might come from lack of standardization in the embedded space and/or lack of documentation from hardware vendors. But it's nevertheless more of a Linux problem, rather than something inherent in tablets.

      Of course, because of all the above I went for a classic netbook instead of a tablet or hybrid. My point isn't that things are peachy, my point is don't throw conspiracy theories at Intel or outright dismiss them as the "bad guys" who make crappy hardware, but rather try to actually understand the problem space.

      A conspirincy THEORY would be something I just think out of my bud, its more a thoughtprocess of what I think is the most plausible reasons, and when we have documented behaviour of sabotaged acpi shit in the past to help microsoft hold their monopoly, its not so unlikly that I am right. Another point would be that intel did also make some antitrust shit in the past.

      Big companies are in general primary evil, how this evilness (maximise of the interest) exactly is working togehter or against others I cant definatly say.

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