Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Running The New Open-Source NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 Series Support In Linux 6.2

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    At least it's working to some degree, there is something to start from.

    Compare this to the new ATSC 3.0 television standard with the AC-4 audio codec which cannot be decoded under Linux. If you're like me, and I know you are, watching reruns of Hogan's Heroes from an antenna, using ATSC 3.0 is a dead end while nVidia may continue to move towards making their hardware work with open source drivers. nVidia may be kinda crappy but they look like saints compared to Dolby Laboratories and the people who got the pay off for forcing that codec on the antenna-dependent people of the USA.

    Perhaps, someday, we can all watch Hogan's Heroes off the air using a current nVidia card with all that wonderful 1960's fidelity coming through loud and clear via the AC-4 codec and an open-source codec. (see how I tied all that together; badly)

    Comment


    • #12
      Originally posted by Classical View Post
      The GTX 600 generation is already very old in the meantime. You can still see for this old generation of GPUs that the proprietary drivers are a lot faster than nouveau.

      We're only going to see good open source drivers if Nvidia discontinues its proprietary drivers. Please have no illusions about that.​
      Not an expert in graphics APIs myself, but I'm guessing that the only hope is with a proper Vulkan driver that has re-clocking, and then running OpenGL on top of it using Zink. I'm guessing it's easier to get a Vulkan driver properly optimized than an OpenGL driver, since Vulkan is lower level.

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by sarmad View Post

        Not an expert in graphics APIs myself, but I'm guessing that the only hope is with a proper Vulkan driver that has re-clocking, and then running OpenGL on top of it using Zink. I'm guessing it's easier to get a Vulkan driver properly optimized than an OpenGL driver, since Vulkan is lower level.
        Most OpenGL code is shared between all Gallium drivers in Mesa, so likely the main holdback of performance here is to do with the shader compiler, which is probably the largest piece of hardware-specific code. A new, modern shader compiler is being written for the Vulkan driver effort (currently called "NAK"), so I suspect once it's working and the NVK Vulkan driver is merged, the Nouveau Gallium driver (which provides OpenGL, Gallium Nine, and also eventually OpenCL via Rusticl) will also be switched to use the new shader compiler.

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by sarmad View Post

          Not an expert in graphics APIs myself, but I'm guessing that the only hope is with a proper Vulkan driver that has re-clocking, and then running OpenGL on top of it using Zink. I'm guessing it's easier to get a Vulkan driver properly optimized than an OpenGL driver, since Vulkan is lower level.
          Your mixing unrelated things together. Re-clocking is part of the firmware which is made visible by the driver where as Vulkan is a graphics API.

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by Classical View Post
            We're only going to see good open source drivers if Nvidia discontinues its proprietary drivers. Please have no illusions about that.​
            I have little doubt that a open source driver stack that can re-clock will surpass the proprietary user-land driver of Nvidia in the next years, that time has now come.

            No one will optimize a opengl driver, or write a full featured vulkan driver for a card that is forced on boot clocks, that is why Nouveau did not perform well in the last 10 or so years.

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by Classical View Post
              We're only going to see good open source drivers if Nvidia discontinues its proprietary drivers. Please have no illusions about that.​
              This is not guaranteed at all unfortunately. Either NVIDIA will itself start hacking nouveau or we'll continue to have a half-assed reverse-engineered driver which faulters hard every now and then and brings the whole system down (considering the Linux kernel monolithic architecture).

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

                Your mixing unrelated things together. Re-clocking is part of the firmware which is made visible by the driver where as Vulkan is a graphics API.
                We are not talking about re-clocking; we are talking about the fact that Nouveau is not very performant even when re-clocking works.

                Comment


                • #18
                  Ive never needed the open source nvidia driver, and I hope I never will.
                  The binary blob: it works! And its fast! I guess linux users (not all) are activists that need everything to be open source... because....?
                  Just doesnt make sense.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by AdamOne View Post
                    Ive never needed the open source nvidia driver, and I hope I never will.
                    The binary blob: it works! And its fast! I guess linux users (not all) are activists that need everything to be open source... because....?
                    Just doesnt make sense.
                    That works great until your laptop is old enough that Nvidia abandons driver development for your machine and you get stuck on an outdated kernel with known security issues.

                    For example my previous laptop is a 13" 2009 MacBook pro with a 2.5Ghz core 2 duo and a SSD I installed years ago. It's plenty fast to surf the web and watch streamed videos (h.264 hardware decode). What it doesn't have is Nvidia binary driver support anymore, and the existing drivers are so old that I'd have to still be on either Ubuntu 16.04 or maybe 18.04.

                    Nouveau works fairly well on that machine, so I've been using that instead and can keep the laptop completely up to date running modern kernels and software.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X