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NVIDIA Transitioning To Official, Open-Source Linux GPU Kernel Driver

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  • Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    I'd like to think it's more like waiting on Jello to turn into Jello. That's fun. Open source drivers and video games are fun

    Your analogy is the death of the planet and totally not fun
    And watching Nvidia take forever to go open source is?

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    • Originally posted by sdack View Post
      And watching Nvidia take forever to go open source is?
      Well, the comments were fun.

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      • Comments on https://us.download.nvidia.com/XFree...rnel_open.html

        The open flavor of kernel modules supports Turing, Ampere, and forward. The open kernel modules cannot support GPUs before Turing, because the open kernel modules depend on the GPU System Processor (GSP) first introduced in Turing.
        GSP constraint seems strange from technical point of view, because proprietary drivers were working also w/o using GSP at the very beginning

        Most features of the Linux GPU driver are supported with the open flavor of kernel modules, including CUDA, Vulkan, OpenGL, OptiX, and X11. However, in the current release, some display and graphics features (notably: G-SYNC, Quadro Sync, SLI, Stereo, rotation in X11, and YUV 4:2:0 on Turing), as well as power management, and NVIDIA virtual GPU (vGPU), are not yet supported. These features will be added in upcoming driver releases
        Use of the open kernel modules on GeForce and Workstation GPUs should be considered alpha-quality in this release due to the missing features listed above.
        Which means CUDA, Vulkan, OpenGL, OptiX, and X11 may work with GeForce parts, barring the listed features

        To enable use of the open kernel modules on GeForce and Workstation GPUs, set the "NVreg_OpenRmEnableUnsupportedGpus" nvidia.ko kernel module parameter to 1. E.g.,
        modprobe nvidia NVreg_OpenRmEnableUnsupportedGpus=1
        With this parameter setting, will Vulkan, OpenGL work with GeForce parts, as per using user space drivers version 515 with proprietary kernel modules?

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        • Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

          Well, the comments were fun.
          In the meantime (5 weeks, months? Years? until nVidia catch up), I get to continue on with the computing part of life on pure-AMD, because it just works.
          Hi

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          • Originally posted by stiiixy View Post

            In the meantime (5 weeks, months? Years? until nVidia catch up), I get to continue on with the computing part of life on pure-AMD, because it just works.
            That's a lie. In terms of Linux integration it might just work. In terms of being bug-free and featureful - that's a bad joke.

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            • You qualify your anecdotal situation about nVidia being great, we're effectively fanboys, and I'm just talking shit my shit just work's.

              Howya going birdie, been awhile 😘
              Hi

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              • Originally posted by birdie View Post

                That's a lie. In terms of Linux integration it might just work. In terms of being bug-free and featureful - that's a bad joke.
                Seeing as how we don't get bug-free and lots of features with Windows or MacOS I'm happy with great AMD Linux integration and everything just working.

                Switching to AMD for my Linux graphics 9 or 10 years ago was the greatest decision I ever made in regards to Linux desktop usage and Linux gaming. That said, I'm eager to see how this plays out and if NVIDIA will become just as integrated as AMD or Intel graphics are with Linux.

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                • Originally posted by birdie View Post
                  That's a lie. In terms of Linux integration it might just work. In terms of being bug-free and featureful - that's a bad joke.
                  Bug free that is basically something no graphics driver is. Nvidia drivers are absolutely not bug free under Linux or Windows.

                  https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/NVIDIA/Troubleshooting

                  There are a lot of failures here that result in no output. This is a big problem if you don't have another device at the time to look up how to fix the failure.

                  https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/AMDGPU#Troubleshooting

                  Yes they do the same for AMD and Intel you will find the AMD and Intel list are a lot shorter. Nvidia lack of integration results in a horrible problem of a lot more failures options that end in no graphical output.

                  There are some bugs that are very Nvidia unique like screwing up due to the fact grub had been using the graphical output before the Nvidia driver starts all your open source drivers Intel AMD.... all do a graphic card reset when the init the card from the Linux kernel so avoiding this problem.

                  Lot of issue come from Nvidia driver getting out of sync with upstream Linux kernel developments as well.

                  birdie what is the point of more features if you are ending up a non functional machine over and over again. I first saw the difference when had one computer with Intel integrated graphics and the other with Nvidia both running Linux I horrible worked out that I was putting 20 times the about hours into the Nvidia machine over the Intel machine to keep in running.

                  There are legal reasons why the kernel driver need to be open source and under a GPLv2 compatible license. There is stability reasons why the driver need to be upstream. Yes the up-streaming process is going to see Nvidia need to change things like adding in a card reset when the kernel inits card.

                  Do note grub causing Nvidia issues is the Linux version the are cases where Windows changes their bootloader and Nvidia dies as well and the failure cause is the same problem Nvidia driver goes off presuming the GPU is in X state but due to firmware/boot loader its in Y state so no output. This also leads to the Nvidia restore from hibernate and things not work.

                  There is a hand full of minor incorrect design choices(mostly Assume something that is not truly set in stone) in the Nvidia driver causing 99% of the failures to start up or restore with graphical output functional and this does not matter if you are on Windows or Linux. The frequency is different due to Linux kernel changing more stuff internally more often than Windows but the design faults causing the failures is not. Microsoft does a major kernel change about 1 every 2 years Linux distributions do this about 2-4 times a year.

                  This is part of the problem why arguing for kernel driver ABI stablity does not get you anywhere as well OS with kernel driver ABI stablity as in Windows still has trouble with Nvidia closed source drivers just at a lower frequency so not solution to problem.

                  Nvidia open source this driver is the step that fixes the legal problem for some parties. S The up-streaming the driver is what will fix a lot of issues as lot of the incorrect assumes Nvidia drivers have will block it from getting upstream into the Linux kernel until those are fixed. Yes all graphics drivers include in the Linux kernel are required not to assume a quite a list of particular things to get merged into the kernel in the first place.

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                  • Still plenty of reasons to choose AMD GPU:
                    • Open source user-space components;
                    • Better price/perf in raster;
                    • Better efficiency in raster;
                    Actually, when you think about it, NVIDIA GPUs do not offer anything better for the Linux desktop user aside CUDA perhaps...

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                    • Originally posted by abu_shawarib View Post

                      Turing is 2000 series not 3000.

                      Then don't spew some random speculations...
                      I have no clue what you're talking about, and one of the main reasons I commonly fail following-up with peoples' hype here. Furthermore, I think what I posted was pretty much right-on the money.

                      See:

                      Turing (microarchitecture)
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_(microarchitecture)

                      The Turing GPU mostly lists these nVidia 2019 and more recent products.
                      GeForce 16 series (2/2019)
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeForce_16_series

                      GeForce 20 series (7/2019)
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeForce_20_series

                      There's a few other GPUs that are older, but I really doubt they'll be included, as most manufacturers' generalize their press releases, then release the specific supported models later.

                      I really doubt most longtime Linux/nVidia users are going to buy into this hype about open source drivers. They've waited too long, and are likely just going to jump ship for Intel's discrete GPU or already have for AMD's open sourced GPUs'.

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