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NVIDIA Proposes The Linux Hardware Timestamping Engine

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925
    Yeah, but this is like nanosecond or microsecond level accuracy and precision. Does robotics need that much accuracy and precision?
    Just because the units are small doesn't mean anything about Nvidia's purpose.

    If I were promoting such a standard for general purpose usage, I'd probably suggest the highest precision I thought was practical, so that it could be also be used for things like scientific instruments and other applications I hadn't even thought of.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925
    Yeah, I thought it might be for some realtime usecase, but with this much accuracy......

    Maybe it's for peripheral hardware validation? Or driver debugging/profiling?
    I don't know why you seem to feel it's unnecessary.

    I can tell you from experience that software timestamping sucks. Especially if you're not using a real RTOS with bounded latencies.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925
    I'm not sure what exactly they need such accurate timestamps for, but I guess we'll find out.
    Sensor data. Accurate timestamps are very important for realtime control applications, such as robotics.

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  • MuPuF
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

    GPU cards? None? Did you read the article?
    Nvidia's timer block has been roughly the same since the TNT2. All their cards have a 32ns resolution for their time IIRC.

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  • jabl
    replied
    Originally posted by timofonic View Post
    IIs it just me or is this just a disguised plan for stronger DRM?
    It's just you.

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  • Azrael5
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

    GPU cards? None? Did you read the article?
    I need the list.

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  • coder
    replied
    Nice feature!

    I'm curious if they provide any support for mapping between the timestamp domains of different providers. Besides the mere ability to generate high-precision timestamps, that's the other thing I'd really like to see.

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  • timofonic
    replied
    IIs it just me or is this just a disguised plan for stronger DRM?

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  • Zan Lynx
    replied
    This kind of thing is especially useful on mobile and embedded hardware where the CPU is often idle and shutdown with no interrupts, and the CPU cores also speed scale.

    On x86 Linux systems it can be quite an effort to get an accurate timestamp, especially if the OS is waking up a thread on a different core, and with things like queued PCIe interrupts. MSI, I think those are called. There can be quite a delay (in interrupt terms) between a device sending MSI and the CPU getting it handled. Well, that is also true of regular interrupts, because the handler has to loop to handle every device that might have raised a shared interrupt.

    I believe I remember reading that some of the flicker bugs in Nvidia's old SLI system were because of inaccurate time stamping.

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  • stormcrow
    replied
    Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
    Which cards will benefit from this feature?
    GPU cards? None? Did you read the article?

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