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NVIDIA Starts Publishing GPU Hardware Documentation To Help Open-Source Drivers

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  • DrLecter
    replied
    hell is freezing?

    Leave a comment:


  • adomas
    replied
    I wonder how long it can take that I will be able to play video games with open source driver? Finally this should enable me to use Wayland too, as now I can't do that with NVIDIA binary drivers.

    Leave a comment:


  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by zexelon View Post
    I have to be honest, I like the proprietary driver... I have a 1070 GTX card and it has performed extremely well both in Windows and Linux using the proprietary driver. It has been a wonderful card in both bare metal OS and GPU pass through situations using the proprietary drivers.

    At the end of the day function is worth more to me than GPL zealotry.

    It is very nice that Nvidia is releasing this documentation, and hopefully yes they release all the spec's needed to get their cards running in the GNU/GPL cult environment... but again... there is nothing wrong with the proprietary drivers and I must admit I am very happy that Nvidia provides them even in the face of all the hate they get from so much of the Linux community. Quite frankly hate that they never get from any other community (OS X, BSD, Windows, etc.)
    The Linux community hates anyone/anything that's not GPL/open no matter how good it intrinsically is.

    NVIDIA is in an order of magnitude more successful than AMD and they release great products which work great but that doesn't stop people from hating them because NVIDIA doesn't offer 100% support for a very peculiar OS barely used by gamers.

    Leave a comment:


  • andreano
    replied
    Originally posted by zexelon View Post
    It is very nice that Nvidia is releasing this documentation, and hopefully they release all the specs needed to get their cards running in the GNU/GPL cult environment...
    Oh, yes.

    On behalf of Linus: Thank you, Nvidia, for hearing us and releasing what you can release for the benefit of free software support. I don't think anyone really expects every problem to be solved overnight. Maybe the signed firmware is a hard problem. But here's to hoping for more miracles of this sort, and more free-software-friendly engineering decisions in future products.

    Leave a comment:


  • zexelon
    replied
    I have to be honest, I like the proprietary driver... I have a 1070 GTX card and it has performed extremely well both in Windows and Linux using the proprietary driver. It has been a wonderful card in both bare metal OS and GPU pass through situations using the proprietary drivers.

    At the end of the day function is worth more to me than GPL zealotry.

    It is very nice that Nvidia is releasing this documentation, and hopefully yes they release all the spec's needed to get their cards running in the GNU/GPL cult environment... but again... there is nothing wrong with the proprietary drivers and I must admit I am very happy that Nvidia provides them even in the face of all the hate they get from so much of the Linux community. Quite frankly hate that they never get from any other community (OS X, BSD, Windows, etc.)

    Leave a comment:


  • enrico.tagliavini
    replied
    Sounds like a bit like: here take this new wonderful car. Oh but you cannot use it anyway as the engine is bricked, you don't have the keys and wheels are only for display.

    Sorry for being negative, but this has no benefit whatsoever for users as long as the cards are completely bricked by the lack of a firmware, and I'm afraid there is no plan at all at NVIDIA to address the situation. Fair enough, they are not obliged to, but I wonder why bother going through the process of releasing this documentation if not just to have a PR statement they do so, like Intel and AMD.

    Leave a comment:


  • pmoreau
    replied
    Originally posted by KillYourFM View Post
    Maybe I'm just ignorant, but honest question: what is so special about this documentation? Is it any different than what has always lived at
    http://download.nvidia.com/open-gpu-doc/ ?
    It is explained in that repo’s README:
    This content was originally kept at:
    http://download.nvidia.com/open-gpu-doc/
    ...but has been moved to github, mainly for easier version tracking. Some of these documents get updates and errata, and the above site was forced to create separate subdirectories for any updates.
    The old location has been deprecated and is no longer updated, and so doesn’t contain the new MMU manuals that were added in the past month on GitHub for example.

    Leave a comment:


  • timofonic
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    So does this mean reclo-

    Oh...

    But seriously... that's the bare minimum we ask of Nvidia. The nouveau devs are smart people and have done a fantastic job considering how little they have to work with. But they can't do anything about the firmware.
    I consider it to be a quixotic effort , really. Too much effort, too little results.

    Nvidia hardware should be totally banned in Linux until Nvidia Corporation really collaborates in the Linux ecosystem in a sane way.

    What about the vaporware effort of a new Unix device memory allocation API that could succeed GBM, EGLStreams and potentially Android's Gralloc? Where's the published stuff? Any news or it's just another Nvidia's bad joke again?

    https://lwn.net/Articles/703749/
    Last edited by timofonic; 08 August 2019, 05:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • entropy
    replied
    Originally posted by cb88 View Post

    You mean like 1440P or something? Well until now AMD hasn't had a GPU architecture that could push 1440P for non trivial tasks... it would probalby make some sense to release som 17in laptops with a mobile HBM based Navi GPU... though. The 5700 itself doesn't make a ton of sense there due to how much power is wasted on GDDR6.
    Hmmm. Do you really think that is the reason?
    I mean the Vega mobile architecture should be capable for that.
    In particular for business notebooks like the Thinkpad T-model a HiDPI display would make totally sense.
    Not so much for a high-end gaming notebook. Agreed.

    Leave a comment:


  • entropy
    replied
    That's a FHD notebook.

    I'm not looking for such a gaming notebook.
    Rather something I can also use for work and, hence, HiDPI would make totally sense for me.
    Last edited by entropy; 08 August 2019, 05:47 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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