Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Trouble wtth a Radeon 7750, Ubuntu 16.04.2, kernel 4.11 and Ryzen.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    I was thinking 17.04 to give you a known starting point for your hardware. If you need to end up on 16.04.2+newer kernel that's ok, I saw 17.04 as a low-risk way to get a 4.10 kernel (for Ryzen) from the start.

    Comment


    • #12
      Use the amdgpu kernel driver, enable SI support for amdgpu driver and disable radeon driver, see the second message:
      https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...in-living-room

      You do not need any other xorg.conf file that is in /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d by default.

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
        Use the amdgpu kernel driver, enable SI support for amdgpu driver and disable radeon driver
        It is already disabled somewhere somehow, but you missed an elephant as usual

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by bridgman View Post
          I was thinking 17.04 to give you a known starting point for your hardware. If you need to end up on 16.04.2+newer kernel that's ok, I saw 17.04 as a low-risk way to get a 4.10 kernel (for Ryzen) from the start.
          I tried your suggestion, unfortunately there is an irq trap, with all the gigabyte motherboards, an conflict with an amd gpio function, so it woudnt boot to the install screen, neither would 16.04.2. I don't know who is to blame, Gigabyte or Cannonical... That is why I had to make a custom kernel when i switched mboards from MSI to Gigabyte.

          Guess I'tt try the debian testing...

          To debianxfce: Thanks for the tip, I'll do that when I install debian.

          Kind regards
          Brut.

          Comment


          • #15
            Well, debian testing was a relief. Should have gone for that distro long ago. Last time i used debian it was so dull, but now. And works without having to recompile the kernel.... Thnx. dungeon..

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by Brutalix View Post
              Well, debian testing was a relief. Should have gone for that distro long ago. Last time i used debian it was so dull, but now. And works without having to recompile the kernel.... Thnx. dungeon..
              Me and my big mouth, well keep getting errors when i am compiling the 4.11 kernel.

              Code:
                LD      kernel/time/built-in.o
                LD      kernel/built-in.o
              scripts/package/Makefile:91: recipe for target 'deb-pkg' failed
              make[1]: *** [deb-pkg] Error 2
              Makefile:1331: recipe for target 'deb-pkg' failed
              make: *** [deb-pkg] Error 2
              So I had to disable CONFIG_SYSTEM_TRUSTED_KEY to get it to compile. I see that there is something about importing keys from the old kernel that or something. But I still don't get why i get the bug. This worked flawlessly in ubuntu.

              Kind regards.
              B.

              Comment


              • #17
                Debian 9+ provides signed and unsigned kernels, i think if you run unsigned one and do localmodconfig this is not needed to remove. But if you run signed one and generate config then it either expect your own keys otherwise you *must* disable that.

                Whatever, it is about custom kernel isn't it, so it is expected you tweak it here and there

                Secure Boots is not yet really ready yet...



                That shit was Debian Stretch release blocker until recently, but is not anymore

                https://lists.debian.org/debian-deve.../msg00013.html
                Last edited by dungeon; 05-09-2017, 05:54 PM.

                Comment


                • #18
                  First off, thanks for the help/advice from all three of you.

                  Just wanted to give a small update.

                  Two ryzen machines are now running debian. One with a 7750 and one with a Rx480. Identical kernels. Both with gigabyte mb, only difference is that one has ECC memory, and the other non-ecc.
                  No crashes, no bugs, everything has been smooth sailing since I installed debian last. Only 2 reboots in 1 month for some software update and bios update to 1.0.0.6.
                  They are crunching freesurfer data 24/7. Which is pretty heavy work for the cpu, and all cores are running at the same time.
                  So considering the heavy work, and no crashes, I am overly pleased with the systems.

                  And I ended up installing padoka ppa for the debian by using the debianxfce guide for gaming. Worked without a hitch.

                  Though I cant complain about my old X99 system either, but reliability seems equal between the systems so far.

                  Kind regards
                  Brut.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Brutalix View Post
                    Two ryzen machines are now running debian. One with a 7750 and one with a Rx480. Identical kernels. Both with gigabyte mb, only difference is that one has ECC memory, and the other non-ecc.
                    No crashes, no bugs, everything has been smooth sailing since I installed debian last. Only 2 reboots in 1 month for some software update and bios update to 1.0.0.6.
                    They are crunching freesurfer data 24/7. Which is pretty heavy work for the cpu, and all cores are running at the same time.
                    So considering the heavy work, and no crashes, I am overly pleased with the systems.
                    Debian testing Xfce is really good with a custom kernel and Oibaf ppa Mesa, built in intel gpu driver, nvidia driver from nvidia site and with the Nouveau driver for an office use. Debian has many fast servers, it is a big organisation, many users, good packaging mechanism and does not have such buggy and old bloatware that derivatives do have. Keep it simple and do not use distribution derivatives. Debian testing does run without systemd, pulseaudio,networkmanager, gnome3 and other garbage software from redhat. Too bad that Debian distribution maintainers do not have a clue what is the best software for the default install and you need to remove or disable them manually after install.
                    Last edited by debianxfce; 07-19-2017, 01:57 AM.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X