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It Looks Like We'll Still See A GUI Control Panel For AMD Linux

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  • It Looks Like We'll Still See A GUI Control Panel For AMD Linux

    Phoronix: It Looks Like We'll Still See A GUI Control Panel For AMD Linux

    Earlier this year I exclusively reported on the "Radeon Settings" GUI control panel may be open-sourced for AMD Linux users but since then I hadn't heard anything publicly or privately about getting this graphics driver control panel on Linux for AMDGPU-PRO and the fully-open AMDGPU stack. But it looks like that it's still being worked on internally at AMD...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ng-The-Pre-Req

  • #2
    If a GUI control panel came to open source AMD i'd be giddy.

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    • #3
      I was really thinking about getting an AMD card this morning. Instead, I went with an Asus GTX 1060... because it was actually cheaper than any RX 480 I could find on Amazon (which I wanted to use since I had credit on there).

      I just... don't really understand the appeal to AMD cards right now, especially with the GTX 1050 Ti being out. I get that it's open-source but the hardware value just isn't that competitive. It uses more power, it runs hotter, and it benchmarks like crap. I would hate to be the guy who had to sell that since it's always a downhill battle.

      I constantly find myself saying I'll go AMD next generation. I still run an FX 8350 and will probably go Zen when it comes out since CPU usually isn't the bottleneck in my system but... the graphics just aren't there and as someone who actually looks at performance per dollar, it seems Nvidia is often better than AMD, despite AMD advertising as a budget line.

      Anyways, the whole rant started because there were a few things I wanted to help development on an AMD card and I'm conflicted because I bought a GTX 1060 for performance and value reasons. I'll still look at Vega cards but... I have high doubt that they'll be below $600 because of the use of HBM2. It's kinda like how the Pro Duo costs $1300 which uses HBM but the GTX 1080 will still easily compete with that $1300 card.

      Looking again, there's a Black Friday deal that makes it even cheaper https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01KU2CIIY (was $169)
      Last edited by computerquip; 11-25-2016, 08:51 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by computerquip View Post
        I was really thinking about getting an AMD card this morning. Instead, I went with an Asus GTX 1060... because it was actually cheaper than any RX 480 I could find on Amazon (which I wanted to use since I had credit on there).

        ...

        Looking again, there's a Black Friday deal that makes it even cheaper https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01KU2CIIY
        I hope you prepared your will and testament for writing such things here, be they true.

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        • #5
          I have just bought a Sapphire Nitro+ 8GB RX 480 £209.99 (w/ Free Civ 6) from Scan believing that in the following couple months AMD will finish to connect all the dots together and provide perfect solution like what Nvidia provide on the closed source side, however they will do it an open source side.Furthermore I still believe that AMD cards definitely is(will be) better in the Vulkan games, DX12 games than the current Nvidia ones. Having read many comments from AMD folks I can see that will happen and probably from the mid of next year here we are talking about the problems just in the "simple past". Thank you all of you who contributes to get the driver in the right shape.

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          • #6
            I'll definitely switch over to them if this happens!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by computerquip View Post
              ...I just... don't really understand the appeal to AMD cards right now, especially with the GTX 1050 Ti being out. I get that it's open-source but the hardware value just isn't that competitive. It uses more power, it runs hotter, and it benchmarks like crap. I would hate to be the guy who had to sell that since it's always a downhill battle.
              AMD GPUs (the ones I've owned) were never as-bad as some people made them out to be, at least in my usage. They worked. Likewise, the NVIDIA dGPU laptop I have is not as "great" as people made it out to be either. It works.

              I don't go by performance benchmarks considering they're only accurate for that one scenario. Drivers change and games become more or less optimized over-time. Not to mention, some reviewers just fake the results anyway or use less-than-respectable testing scenarios, and really, you only have their word to go on as to how accurate the numbers really are. So buying a GPU because of a pretty bar graph isn't ideal, to me anyway.

              With that in-mind though, I've had nothing but headache with NVIDIA drivers and distro-hopping. I'd never consider buying another NVIDIA GPU or laptop unless nouveau becomes competitive, and even then, I can't say I'd have any real reason to not buy AMD still.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                But it looks like that it's still being worked on internally at AMD...
                At the risk of sounding like Mr. Negative, I was trying to say "working on CCC wouldn't make sense until the underlying driver bits are there" rather than "work on CCC is proceeding and that's why we are adding things like fan control". That said, every related feature that goes into the driver stack is one less obstacle to worry about later.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post

                  AMD GPUs (the ones I've owned) were never as-bad as some people made them out to be, at least in my usage. They worked. Likewise, the NVIDIA dGPU laptop I have is not as "great" as people made it out to be either. It works.

                  I don't go by performance benchmarks considering they're only accurate for that one scenario. Drivers change and games become more or less optimized over-time. Not to mention, some reviewers just fake the results anyway or use less-than-respectable testing scenarios, and really, you only have their word to go on as to how accurate the numbers really are. So buying a GPU because of a pretty bar graph isn't ideal, to me anyway.

                  With that in-mind though, I've had nothing but headache with NVIDIA drivers and distro-hopping. I'd never consider buying another NVIDIA GPU or laptop unless nouveau becomes competitive, and even then, I can't say I'd have any real reason to not buy AMD still.
                  I have the similar experience with Nvidia drivers. First of all, everybody was saying: "Nvidia is the best and the greatest on Linux", so I bought a laptop with a nvidia card a few years back. The result was unexpected black screens after updates and other problems. So after beeing fed up I tried an amd card, back then on fglrx and everybody was saying: "you are an idiot, you will have soooo many problems"...

                  It was an HD5750 and honestly, I didn't have a single one...the gaming performance wasn't great but I didn't care about that at the moment. Then, after learning about amds open source plans, I was hooked and these days you could probably call me an amd fanboy... But I basicly only buy their cards.

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                  • #10
                    They should do simple GUI in a month or so and that is it ... no one expect vendors to do RadeonPro or nVidia Inspector GUIs

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