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AMD Sends Out Patches For New AMDGPU DAL Display Driver, Adds 93k Lines Of Code

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Min1123 View Post



    Sorry, I can't figure out how to turn a personal repo into an anongit repo to clone anonymously. I think I may just have to wait until it gets pulled by something I have access to.
    Yep. If he's able to mirror it to github, it would be easier.

    Maybe he reads this, set up a github account and make the mirroring

    Are we getting dumb about this fake Open Source disguising? If AMD wants to be really Linux friendly, make your firmware Open. Please contribute to OpenRadeonBios or make your own one.

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/openradeonbios/

    Will we need to deal with firmware blobs? I don't see it as pragmatic, but a trap that hides potential improvements, fixes and may have potential security issues.
    Last edited by timofonic; 02-12-2016, 08:22 AM.

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    • #22
      STUTTERING with V-Sync OFF:
      When frame rate is too low and you perceive it, usually bellow 30 fps.

      TEARING with V-Sync OFF:
      EVERYTIME and ONLY when game frame rate goes ABOVE display refresh rate.


      If your rig is powerful enough to game ALWAYS be above 30 fps and game frame rate NEVER goes above display refresh rate, your shouldn't need G-Sync of FreeSync.

      So, it might be a good idea have a 144Hz display and make sure that game graphics settings are set in such a way that game doesn't go bellow 30-40 fps and doesn't go above 144 fps.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by AJSB View Post
        STUTTERING with V-Sync OFF:
        When frame rate is too low and you perceive it, usually bellow 30 fps.

        TEARING with V-Sync OFF:
        EVERYTIME and ONLY when game frame rate goes ABOVE display refresh rate.


        If your rig is powerful enough to game ALWAYS be above 30 fps and game frame rate NEVER goes above display refresh rate, your shouldn't need G-Sync of FreeSync.

        So, it might be a good idea have a 144Hz display and make sure that game graphics settings are set in such a way that game doesn't go bellow 30-40 fps and doesn't go above 144 fps.
        That's just plain wrong.
        1) You get tearing with v-sync off, also when fps<display refresh rate, making your argument completely invalid.
        2) V-sync is not an option when you don't have constant frametimes.
        3) It's not only a breakthrough for gaming. Remember video clips/movies w/ different frame rates (24, 25, 30, 60, etc., and then the worst llike 24000/1001, etc.). You just can't map that to a single, fixed frame rate. And please keep pull-down techniques away from me! We need vrr in full-screen video players, too.
        [4) 30 fps is way too low for many, but that's not the point here]


        The topic is really easy to understand, so I don't get why you try to deny it like that.
        Also, you clearly never sat in front of a synchronised display. If you don't understand it, you at least experience it.

        tl;dr: VRR is one of the greatest developments in display technology in the last years. I also want it on linux

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        • #24
          Originally posted by AJSB View Post
          STUTTERING with V-Sync OFF:
          When frame rate is too low and you perceive it, usually bellow 30 fps.

          TEARING with V-Sync OFF:
          EVERYTIME and ONLY when game frame rate goes ABOVE display refresh rate.


          If your rig is powerful enough to game ALWAYS be above 30 fps and game frame rate NEVER goes above display refresh rate, your shouldn't need G-Sync of FreeSync.

          So, it might be a good idea have a 144Hz display and make sure that game graphics settings are set in such a way that game doesn't go bellow 30-40 fps and doesn't go above 144 fps.
          Prediction: In the decade 2020-2029, displays will start to be getting per-window refresh rates.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by juno View Post

            That's just plain wrong.
            1) You get tearing with v-sync off, also when fps<display refresh rate, making your argument completely invalid.
            2) V-sync is not an option when you don't have constant frametimes.
            3) It's not only a breakthrough for gaming. Remember video clips/movies w/ different frame rates (24, 25, 30, 60, etc., and then the worst llike 24000/1001, etc.). You just can't map that to a single, fixed frame rate. And please keep pull-down techniques away from me! We need vrr in full-screen video players, too.
            [4) 30 fps is way too low for many, but that's not the point here]


            The topic is really easy to understand, so I don't get why you try to deny it like that.
            Also, you clearly never sat in front of a synchronised display. If you don't understand it, you at least experience it.

            tl;dr: VRR is one of the greatest developments in display technology in the last years. I also want it on linux
            All participants in this forum discussion know how VRR/FreeSync/G-Sync works, but it is hard to formulate perfect sentences about it.

            A perfect sentence = A sentence that, after some analysis, does not contradict itself (not even partially)

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            • #26
              Originally posted by juno View Post
              That's just plain wrong.
              1) You get tearing with v-sync off, also when fps<display refresh rate, making your argument completely invalid.
              2) V-sync is not an option when you don't have constant frametimes.
              3) It's not only a breakthrough for gaming. Remember video clips/movies w/ different frame rates (24, 25, 30, 60, etc., and then the worst llike 24000/1001, etc.). You just can't map that to a single, fixed frame rate. And please keep pull-down techniques away from me! We need vrr in full-screen video players, too.
              [4) 30 fps is way too low for many, but that's not the point here]
              5) No matter what your fixed display refresh rate is: The latency with adaptive sync is lower, as long as your gpu can't reach the display's framerate.
              Last edited by jf33; 02-12-2016, 09:10 AM. Reason: Made a mistake counting to five... lol

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              • #27
                Originally posted by juno View Post

                That's just plain wrong.
                1) You get tearing with v-sync off, also when fps<display refresh rate, making your argument completely invalid.
                2) V-sync is not an option when you don't have constant frametimes.
                3) It's not only a breakthrough for gaming. Remember video clips/movies w/ different frame rates (24, 25, 30, 60, etc., and then the worst llike 24000/1001, etc.). You just can't map that to a single, fixed frame rate. And please keep pull-down techniques away from me! We need vrr in full-screen video players, too.
                [4) 30 fps is way too low for many, but that's not the point here]


                The topic is really easy to understand, so I don't get why you try to deny it like that.
                Also, you clearly never sat in front of a synchronised display. If you don't understand it, you at least experience it.

                tl;dr: VRR is one of the greatest developments in display technology in the last years. I also want it on linux
                Welcome to the world of everything fullscreen ... Oh wait ...

                All the G-sync and Freesync debate is an artificial problem (kind of like crying about overclocking limits). Anybody that can notice tearing on a 60Hz display when the game is running 80+ fps is NOT playing the game but looking for tearing. If your system cannot handle you refresh rate, it's again not a problem that G-sync or Freesync can solve, it just hides an issue.

                Basically the topic looks like a bunch of gamers finding excuses why somebody else is better than them (and since Nvidia income is dependent on those, they come up with a placebo).

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                • #28
                  You clearly have no idea what you are talking about. Have you ever had a synced display? Have you ever had one with 144 Hz?
                  It's not like you don't notice it, when you're not "looking for tearing". The type of people you mean that doesn't notice tearing doesn't even know what tearing ist. But they indeed notice that there's something wrong, they just don't know that it could be better. If you tell them, you ruin them. Same goes for the 60 vs >100 Hz panels, classic vs HFR movies debate and much more. Once you have it, you don't want to go back... ever.
                  Also you seem to think it is indispensable for a good gaming experience to keep the fps above the panel's refresh rate. Again, wrong. Per frame syncing is not hiding an issue, it is expanding possibilities. There are games that demand high frame rates, both in terms of latency and visual experience, and then there are games where you could easily go for more eye candy at the expense of lower frame rates. It has always been like this and it will stay like this.
                  That has nothing to do with crying gamers.
                  It's something completely different than 3D displays. It is useful and adds value. Not only for games, as I mentioned before. Btw. what's your problem with fullscreen? This is highly hypothetical but if the compositor etc. implemented variable refresh rates, you could benefit in windowed-applications, too.
                  Btw. implementation on a lower level could not only give benefit in terms of satisfaction but also power efficiency. Google up panel self refresh, it is a thing and it is useful.

                  If you have tried it and don't want it and don't think you will for the next years, it's ok. But don't call it a placebo or made-up solution for a non-existent problem.

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                  • #29
                    I've been using g-sync monitor on linux for about 3 months now, and i agree with everything juno said in last post.
                    But i can add a video made of Asus PG279Q on linux playing Saints Row, colors are wrong cos i still don't know how to capture it correctly and don't have a camera stand, to capture the screen from front. So basically g-sync (or freesync) is really good for 30-60fps gaming and overall "smoothness" of gaming" But on this monitor it works from 30 up to 165 hz so you can live with drops to 40 but you can really see when it goes over 60.
                    After using one for playing fps games like cs:go, you never want go lower than 120 again.
                    Anyway here's the video, fps counter is built into monitor so it shows what the panel is at currently, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2UZtg6t0PA

                    EDIT
                    On the videos and sync topic, looks like with the latest nvidia 361.28 drivers, fullscreen html5 videos are g-synced in browsers again.
                    Last edited by sterky; 02-12-2016, 11:33 AM.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by chuckula View Post
                      Is this going to provide Freesync support for Linux? Nvidia has had G-sync "available" on Linux for about a year now and it would be nice to see AMD implement the standard Freesync on a platform other than Windows.
                      fixed qotes

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