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AMD Sends Out Patches For New AMDGPU DAL Display Driver, Adds 93k Lines Of Code

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  • AMD Sends Out Patches For New AMDGPU DAL Display Driver, Adds 93k Lines Of Code

    Phoronix: AMD Sends Out Patches For New AMDGPU DAL Display Driver, Adds 93k Lines Of Code

    AMD's new "DAL" display driver has been posted for review as the new display component to the AMDGPU kernel DRM driver...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ches-Published

  • #2
    Is this going to provide Freesync support for Linux? Nvidia has had G-sync available on Linux for about a year now and it would be nice to see AMD implement the so-called "standard" Freesync on a platform other than Windows.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by chuckula View Post
      Is this going to provide Freesync support for Linux? Nvidia has had G-sync available on Linux for about a year now and it would be nice to see AMD implement the so-called "standard" Freesync on a platform other than Windows.
      Seeing how unpopular both G-sync and Freesync are even on Windows, I wouldn't keep my hopes up. It seems to me more people prefer 120Hz+ monitors instead, since they effectively yield the same results while not being restricted by hardware.
      I'm sure Freesync will come some day, but I'm sure AMD sees it as a low priority for Linux (possibly lower than Crossfire, I'm not sure).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
        Seeing how unpopular both G-sync and Freesync are even on Windows, I wouldn't keep my hopes up. It seems to me more people prefer 120Hz+ monitors instead, since they effectively yield the same results while not being restricted by hardware.
        I'm sure Freesync will come some day, but I'm sure AMD sees it as a low priority for Linux (possibly lower than Crossfire, I'm not sure).
        I'm not sure what you're on about. A higher refresh rate monitor wouldn't "give the same result" as Freesync/G-sync just by itself. Also, most new higher-than-60 Hz monitors have Freesync support these days, and most that don't have G-Sync support.

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        • #5
          Does ZeroCore already work with AMDGPU?

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          • #6
            Higher refresh rate monitors are nice, but that's not what Freesync and G-sync are targeting. Any of the adaptive-refresh rate protocols target situations where the frame rate drops *below* the full refresh rate of the monitor. Without adaptive refresh you have the choice of incomplete frame rendering (tearing) or stuttering with traditional V-sync.

            So basically, G-sync & Freesync are there to improve situations where your framerate is still somewhat playable (e.g. 20 - 50 FPS) but below the full-refresh rate of your monitor. Obviously if you can hit a frame rate that maxes out the refresh rate none of this is important, but that's not possible to do for all situations.

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            • #7
              The major problem with low FPS are sudden large drops of FPS. I.e. if the game cannot manage a steady 60 FPS with 60 Hz refresh rate, the FPS will instantly drop to 1/2, 1/3 etc. of the refresh rate. i.e. 60/2 = 30, 60/3 = 20 etc. If the monitor's refresh rates are quite high to start with, it definitely looks quite a bit better in this regard. A game that not quite manages 60 FPS on a 120 Hz refresh rate will drop down to 120/3 = 40 FPS, then to 120/4 = 30, 120/5 = 24 and so on. With nowadays typical 144 Hz the differences between swap intervals get even smaller. This is what schmidtbag was trying to explain.
              Last edited by brent; 02-11-2016, 05:51 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by chuckula View Post
                Higher refresh rate monitors are nice, but that's not what Freesync and G-sync are targeting.
                What you say is technically true, but with high refresh rate monitors you can achieve similar results as with adaptive sync (at least in theory). Think of what would happen if you had a monitor with an infinitely high refresh rate. Once the gpu is done with rendering a frame, it would show up immediately, with no delay. Then this rendered image would be refreshed many times (which the user doesn't recognise) until the next frame is done, which then would be displayed without a delay again. So the user's impression would be the very same as with Freesync.

                Of course this theory doesn't quite fit in practice, because the fastest refreshing displays are about 144 Hz. Also, high rate refreshing has the disadvantage that you need more bandwidth for the video memory and display cable - and as a consequence more electric power However, I can understand that some people prefer a display with high refresh rate which works with all gpu vendors and is additionally a bit cheaper than adaptive sync monitors. They at least have a kind of similar effect.

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                • #9
                  Back to the patches . . .

                  So has this made it into a GIT REPO, or is it just a bunch of patches prior to any specific pull request?
                  If it has, where? I'd like to feed it to my 380X (Tonga/Antigua) and see what happens.

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                  • #10
                    The patches are available at https://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/...xt-4.6-wip-dal for easier reading (and testing). These patches just hit the dri-devel mailing list but you can feel free to run this and let me know what you find.

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