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Many More AMD FreeSync Monitors Are On The Way

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  • Many More AMD FreeSync Monitors Are On The Way

    Phoronix: Many More AMD FreeSync Monitors Are On The Way

    A number of new monitors that support AMD FreeSync are being shown off this week at CES. FreeSync is AMD's method of matching the monitor's variable refresh rate to that of the graphics card that is similar to the now VESA-approved DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTg3OTg

  • #2
    Seems like there's already more brands supporting Freesync than G-Sync. G-sync, to my knowledge, is only supported by Asus, Acer, Philips, AOC, and BenQ.

    Looks like AMD did something right if so many brands are jumping in.

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    • #3
      G-Sync OR Freesync

      Damn it. We will now have the choice between (seems to be cheaper) AMD freesync monitors and their pretty bad Linux drivers or (quite expensive) Nvidia G-sync monitors and their not so bad drivers ...

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      • #4
        I wonder when AMD will come out with something that doesn't require people to buy new hardware.

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        • #5
          There is actually a newer press release which lists the upcoming FreeSync monitors:

          http://ir.amd.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=74...ews&id=2002910
          No mentioning of the panel technology, though

          Originally posted by phoronix
          One of the nicest FreeSync monitors shown off thus far is the LG 34UM67 that is a 34-inch 21:9 ultra-wide display running at 3440 x 1440, per the PR from last week.
          The 34UM67 is running at 2560x1080 and the press release did not claim otherwise AFAICT.

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          • #6
            To me it seems really strange to have vendor specific implementations of this. Do they say if these new free sync screens also supports dp adaptive sync? I guess it's no real harm to have the vendor specific version if they support the standard as well.

            I want to remember that is was at least some kind of support in the dvi standard, but it didn't get anywhere for some reason?

            /Markus

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            • #7
              That Nixeus monitor looks nice on paper. 144 Hz (I assume this is the maximum refresh rate, would be nice if they also said the minimum) and 1080p at 24". I can't afford the hardware to drive a 1440p monitor yet, and 27" sounds too large for 1080p. However, I've never heard of the Nixeus brand before.

              Originally posted by eydee View Post
              I wonder when AMD will come out with something that doesn't require people to buy new hardware.
              It's not like G-Sync doesn't require you to buy new hardware, either a new monitor, or that addon kit. If you're talking about a new graphics card, fine. But long-term gain > short-term gain.

              Originally posted by Qaz` View Post
              To me it seems really strange to have vendor specific implementations of this. Do they say if these new free sync screens also supports dp adaptive sync? I guess it's no real harm to have the vendor specific version if they support the standard as well.

              I want to remember that is was at least some kind of support in the dvi standard, but it didn't get anywhere for some reason?

              /Markus
              FreeSync is just the driver part that takes advantage of Adaptive-Sync. G-Sync could start supporting Adaptive-Sync (the VESA standard) too, and these monitors should then work automatically with G-Sync. That's why AMD's approach is superior. Of course, we all know Nvidia, they won't support the standard, and will continue with their own implementation.
              Last edited by xeekei; 05 January 2015, 10:50 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by xeekei View Post
                FreeSync is just the driver part that takes advantage of Adaptive-Sync. G-Sync could start supporting Adaptive-Sync (the VESA standard) too, and these monitors should then work automatically with G-Sync. That's why AMD's approach is superior. Of course, we all know Nvidia, they won't support the standard, and will continue with their own implementation.
                I was just about to write this. Thanks for doing it for me

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by xeekei View Post
                  That Nixeus monitor looks nice on paper. 144 Hz (I assume this is the maximum refresh rate, would be nice if they also said the minimum) and 1080p at 24". I can't afford the hardware to drive a 1440p monitor yet, and 27" sounds too large for 1080p. However, I've never heard of the Nixeus brand before.



                  It's not like G-Sync doesn't require you to buy new hardware, either a new monitor, or that addon kit. If you're talking about a new graphics card, fine. But long-term gain > short-term gain.



                  FreeSync is just the driver part that takes advantage of Adaptive-Sync. G-Sync could start supporting Adaptive-Sync (the VESA standard) too, and these monitors should then work automatically with G-Sync. That's why AMD's approach is superior. Of course, we all know Nvidia, they won't support the standard, and will continue with their own implementation.
                  Right, the article says "similar", but I see now that even amd themselves are saying adaptive-sync compatible monitors and not free-sync monitors (doesn't seem to stop the tech media from doing so). I guess nvidia will move over once the hype dies down.

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                  • #10
                    "21:9 ultra-wide display"

                    Am I the only one who is REALLY getting sick of how monitors are getting wider and wider? It is difficult to find monitors with even a reasonable compromise now (16:10), and practically impossible to get a good proper 4:3 resolution.

                    Monitor manufacturers make a note: when you make the monitor wider, you kill actual usability by shrinking the usable space down to NOTHING by creating a relative NO HEIGHT ratio. The only PRACTICAL way to work with a wide area, is dual monitors with a PHYSICAL separation between them that allows you to treat the two "halves" as being entirely separate.

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