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11-Way AMD Radeon GPU Comparison On Linux 3.12, Mesa 9.3

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  • 11-Way AMD Radeon GPU Comparison On Linux 3.12, Mesa 9.3

    Phoronix: 11-Way AMD Radeon GPU Comparison On Linux 3.12, Mesa 9.3

    After last week delivering new AMD Radeon HD 7000 Gallium3D benchmarks from the Mesa 9.3 development driver and the Linux 3.12 Git kernel, up today is a much larger open-source AMD Radeon graphics comparison using the latest code that's yet to be officially released. From the Linux 3.12 kernel and Mesa 9.3-devel, eleven different AMD Radeon graphics cards spanning multiple generations were compared with the latest open-source Linux graphics driver code.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=19141

  • Tyler_K
    replied
    Originally posted by ThoM View Post
    I do not know what exactly was wrong, but since i updated mesa (on gentoo 9.2.0-r1) and the latest emul-linux-x86 (20131008) everything just runs as it is supposed to.
    while sb support was being built by default in Mesa 9.2, this feature wasn't enabled by default (you'd have had to done that yourself). In recent 9.3 dev, sb is now turned on by default. Perhaps the gentoo packagers backported that change, and you picked it up with your update. shrugs.

    Leave a comment:


  • ThoM
    replied
    I do not know what exactly was wrong, but since i updated mesa (on gentoo 9.2.0-r1) and the latest emul-linux-x86 (20131008) everything just runs as it is supposed to.

    Leave a comment:


  • ThoM
    replied
    Originally posted by Asariati View Post
    What is your hardware (CPU and GPU)?
    Hi Asariati,
    current setup:

    GPU: Radeon HD5870
    CPU: i5-3570K

    Leave a comment:


  • Asariati
    replied
    Originally posted by ThoM View Post
    First of all. Hi to everyone.
    I am visiting phorinix.com for some time now and it's really a great site!

    Now the cause for finally registring for the forums:
    What am i doing wrong with my gentoo machine. Because when testing nexiuz and xonotic the fps don't come near the results of the phorinix benchmarks.
    But when booting Fedora 20 Alpha everything changes for the good. Even for tf2 and dota2.
    Currently i have mesa 9.2 and xf86-video-ati-7.2.0 running in both distros.
    Where is the bottleneck?
    Shure, i could switch over to fedora or whatever, but i like the gentoo way more.
    What is your hardware (CPU and GPU)?

    Leave a comment:


  • ThoM
    replied
    First of all. Hi to everyone.
    I am visiting phorinix.com for some time now and it's really a great site!

    Now the cause for finally registring for the forums:
    What am i doing wrong with my gentoo machine. Because when testing nexiuz and xonotic the fps don't come near the results of the phorinix benchmarks.
    But when booting Fedora 20 Alpha everything changes for the good. Even for tf2 and dota2.
    Currently i have mesa 9.2 and xf86-video-ati-7.2.0 running in both distros.
    Where is the bottleneck?
    Shure, i could switch over to fedora or whatever, but i like the gentoo way more.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vim_User
    replied
    Originally posted by DarkFoss View Post
    Perhaps AMD's new Mantle will bring performance gains to linux gaming eventually? (Steam OS first?)
    Only if:
    - it comes to Linux
    - You have a GPU with GCN architecture

    Leave a comment:


  • DarkFoss
    replied
    Will Mantle help bridge the performance gap down the road?

    Perhaps AMD's new Mantle will bring performance gains to linux gaming eventually? (Steam OS first?)

    Leave a comment:


  • b15hop
    replied
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post
    Yes, if we wanted to "start over" and discard most of a $20-50M investment (I don't know the exact numbers) in the current driver... but where is the justification for doing that ? Going with gallium3d, for example, would just mean replacing our existing hardware layer (hwl) with a different one a bit further down the stack. Having the hwl further down the stack does make for a smaller and more maintainable hwl driver and allows relatively more of the upper level code to be common, but also tends to make performance tuning more difficult once you get out to the edges.

    If we were writing new drivers from scratch (which AFAIK was the scenario VMware faced when writing gallium3d-based drivers for their emulated SVGA hardware) *and* were looking for a good compromise between maintainability and performance then using gallium3d would make a lot of sense. In the case of both AMD and NVidia, however, where workstation and gaming markets both require "every last scrap of performance" to win sales, going with something more specialized is usually the only option.

    The key point though is that it's not "lack of use of open source code" that keeps the closed driver closed, it's the need to design it around non-Linux operating systems. We could make a closed-source driver using some open source code but it would still have to be closed source.
    Yeah that's what I thought. The original drivers are built for windows and mac I assume. At least mac is closer to linux, pretty much is.

    What do you think about Gabe's / Valve's new gaming box? I bet that thing isn't open source either. Even if it is running linux. If the thing sells very well, ie beats PS4 and xbox, then we might see better Linux drivers?

    Leave a comment:


  • tulioserpio
    replied
    [QUOTE=kwahoo;359124]No, it hasn't. I posted my 6670 results while ago.

    Great!

    Is there any differences if the brand is ATI or AMD or Sapphire?

    Thanks for your time

    Leave a comment:

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