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  • And yes I do use gentoo - because the gentoo community is the best around and ofcourse gentoo allows me to be super lazy

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    • Griz64 is coming... don't argue!!!

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      • Originally posted by D0pamine View Post
        I really don't care what wikipedia says on this - this is fact. I use the GNU Network Object Model Environment which has all been compiled by the GNU C Compiler ....end of!
        I'm not referencing wikipedia.

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        • Originally posted by D0pamine View Post
          I really don't care what wikipedia says on this - this is fact. I use the GNU Network Object Model Environment which has all been compiled by the GNU C Compiler ....end of!
          Maybe you should point out that the Linux foundation is wrong then as well.

          http://www.linuxfoundation.org/news-...ard-base-40-an



          Linux Foundation Announces Certifications to Linux Standard Base 4.0 and Public Beta 4.1


          By Linux_Foundation - December 8, 2010 - 7:22am

          Linux Foundation Announces Certifications to Linux Standard Base 4.0 and Public Beta 4.1
          Novell, Oracle, Red Hat, Ubuntu and all major distributions are certified
          SAN FRANCISCO, December 8, 2010 ? The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that all the leading commercial Linux companies are certified to Linux Standard Base 4.0 (LSB 4.0), including Canonical, Kylin, Linpus, Mandriva, Neoshine, Novell, Oracle, Red Flag and Red Hat.
          The Linux Foundation has also released a beta of the LSB 4.1 and is soliciting feedback from the public. The official release of LSB 4.1 is expected in January. For more details, please visit: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/en/LSB_4.1_Beta.
          The LSB delivers interoperability between applications and the Linux operating system, allowing application developers to target multiple versions of Linux with just one software package. It also allows Linux vendors to demonstrate to their customers that they meet a common set of industry standards and that they work together as an industry on advancing Linux.
          ?We are pleased to release the next version of the LSB to the public. We are also happy to report that the distribution community has worked together on the standard and all are certified,? said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. ?This is good for the Linux community, good for Linux customers and good for Linux vendors.?
          An operating system?s success is inextricably linked with the number and quality of applications that run on top of it. Linux and its variances between distributions, however, present ISVs and individual developers with a unique set of challenges. The LSB was created to solve these challenges and lower the overall costs of supporting the Linux platform. By reducing the differences among individual Linux distributions, the LSB significantly reduces the costs involved with porting applications to different distributions, as well as lowers the cost and effort involved in after-market support of those applications.
          About The Linux Foundation
          The Linux Foundation is a nonprofit consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux. Founded in 2007, the organization sponsors the work of Linux creator Linus Torvalds and promotes, protects and advances the Linux operating system by marshaling the resources of its members and the open source development community. The Linux Foundation provides a neutral forum for collaboration and education by hosting technical events, including LinuxCon, and generating original Linux research and content that advances the understanding of the Linux platform. Its web properties, including Linux.com, reach approximately two million people per month. The organization also provides extensive Linux training opportunities that feature the Linux kernel community?s leading experts as instructors. Follow The Linux Foundation on Twitter.
          ###
          Trademarks: The Linux Foundation, Linux Standard Base. Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds.


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          • Originally posted by deanjo View Post
            Maybe you should point out that the Linux foundation is wrong then as well.

            http://www.linuxfoundation.org/news-...ard-base-40-an
            LINUX is a kernel - not an operating system

            please do not dispute this fact because I really cant be arsed explaining this again to nubs as its already very well documented

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            • Originally posted by D0pamine View Post
              LINUX is a kernel - not an operating system

              please do not dispute this fact because I really cant be arsed explaining this again to nubs as its already very well documented
              Tell that to the linux foundation.

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              • http://www.kernel.org/

                Code:
                What is Linux?
                
                   Linux is a clone of the operating system Unix,   written from scratch by Linus Torvalds with assistance from a   loosely-knit team of hackers across the Net. It aims towards   POSIX and Single UNIX   Specification compliance.

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                • http://www.linux.com/learn/resource-...erating-system

                  What is Linux?

                  Linux is, in simplest terms, an operating system. It is the software on a computer that enables applications and the computer operator to access the devices on the computer to perform desired functions. The operating system (OS) relays instructions from an application to, for instance, the computer's processor. The processor performs the instructed task, then sends the results back to the application via the operating system.
                  Explained in these terms, Linux is very similar to other operating systems, such as Windows and OS X.

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                  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOME

                    Yes it does run on any kernel you wish - because its FREE software - you are FREE to do as you wish with it. Provided those freedoms are passed on to others ofcourse

                    but linux is a kernel - not an operating system!! end of story!!!

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                    • You are a N00b , plz educate yourself before arguing as you just make yourself look foolish

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