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A Big Comparison Of The AMD Catalyst, Mesa & Gallium3D Drive

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  • #61
    Originally posted by liam View Post
    My 8400gs has always had tearing with the blob, even when drawing with ogl. Don't expect the tearing to go away with nvidia.
    Btw, the player used doesn't matter for me.
    Sorry, but as far as I can remember my linux experience when I ran Nvidia with nvidia drivers, I can't remember having seen any video tearing at all. The video quality was just clean.
    But I'm talking of times when the Nvidia 6400 GTS was the board to have, which places us somewhere in 2004.
    Perhaps since those old days has nvidia as much tearing as ATI do, but that's not what i've read so far from nvidia users.

    Anyway, if the tearing is corrected with the 2011.1 ati drivers, it's old story now...

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    • #62
      Originally posted by energyman View Post
      200 000?? If you get one for cheap?
      Should be possible to raise shouldn't it? And hey! Its charity, its tax deductible!

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      • #63
        I can see why patent crap is annoying and discouraging, but it is essentially a distribution issue, and not an implementation issue.

        There are places in this world where software patents effectively do not exist (all of Europe, at least at this moment), and you can distribute "infringing" drivers just fine, just like you can distribute MP3 decoders and encoders just fine.

        The users from non-free parts of the world can always download the source from a European server and compile it themselves. It is a pain in the ass, but it shouldn't be a killer argument. After all, we all use MP3s and MPEG-4 on our computers, although these are heavily patent encumbered, don't we?

        The problem was and remains the lack of manpower.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by crispy View Post
          Should be possible to raise shouldn't it? And hey! Its charity, its tax deductible!
          Well, make that 1 mil for 5 devs, otherwise you won't get any real results.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
            Well, make that 1 mil for 5 devs, otherwise you won't get any real results.
            why not try starting with 1 dev for six months. see how it goes. if it is a success then extend it.

            krita hired one of their GSOC alumnus for 3 months with 3k.
            http://krita.org/index.php&option=com_content&id=20

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            • #66
              Originally posted by ssam View Post
              why not try starting with 1 dev for six months. see how it goes. if it is a success then extend it.

              krita hired one of their GSOC alumnus for 3 months with 3k.
              http://krita.org/index.php&option=com_content&id=20

              as stated above the problem is that you need much more than 4-5 seasoned devs in order to get results.

              and again some things don't help in order to have resources shared more efficiently now ie intel doing classic all the others doing gallium

              linux (or open source since more people use mesa) graphics needs a dictator i think (similar to torvalds)

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              • #67
                There is a huge difference between Krita and a modern OpenGL driver. You really need a seasoned developer, or an experienced programmer with a few months spare time just for figuring out what goes where.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by energyman View Post
                  well, if 'desktop' oriented linux companies like Canonical would stop to create unneeded 'eye candy' like 20+ brown gtk themes or fonts nobody needs and would hire driver devs instead - that would help a lot.

                  Redhat, Novell, IBM etc employ devs who do amazing work to give us up to date chipset, networking, controller, etc drivers. Canonical?
                  The main reason why I *cannot* use Fedora/OpenSUSE is that their font rendering sucks. Ubuntu's font rendering is way better.

                  You can have fun with those network drivers and 4096 system you'll never see in person but I'll take a new, readable font thankyouverymuch.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                    The main reason why I *cannot* use Fedora/OpenSUSE is that their font rendering sucks. Ubuntu's font rendering is way better.

                    You can have fun with those network drivers and 4096 system you'll never see in person but I'll take a new, readable font thankyouverymuch.
                    Not to provoke this hornets' nest of personal preference, but couldn't you just install the font they made? I personally use the droid font almost everywhere; it's in my package manager along with a lot of other crappy fonts.

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                      The main reason why I *cannot* use Fedora/OpenSUSE is that their font rendering sucks. Ubuntu's font rendering is way better.

                      You can have fun with those network drivers and 4096 system you'll never see in person but I'll take a new, readable font thankyouverymuch.
                      +1

                      Fonts that don't suck is one of the most important features for me too. Yes, they don't want to risk patent infringement and so don't provide bytecode interpreter and LCD filtering, but frankly, I don't give a damn. I want readable, good looking fonts.

                      Unfortunately we have a similar situation with upstream Mesa and GL3 patents even though it's possible to provide full support but leave it up to each distro to actually enable it.

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