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ATI R300 Gallium3D DRI Support Is "Done"

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  • phoronix
    started a topic ATI R300 Gallium3D DRI Support Is "Done"

    ATI R300 Gallium3D DRI Support Is "Done"

    Phoronix: ATI R300 Gallium3D DRI Support Is "Done"

    A month ago we shared that the Gallium3D driver for the ATI R300/400/500 graphics cards (up through the Radeon X1000 series) was mostly done. Now today, the key author of the R300 Gallium3D driver, Corbin Simpson, has updated the status wiki to reflect the latest changes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzY4Ng

  • piete
    replied
    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
    Just a word of warning, modifying the bios of a mobile card is more risky than what I did. If something goes wrong, you'll have to restore the bios blind (so make sure you make a thorough list of steps and keyboard commands that restore the original bios *before* you try anything risky).

    What I did was create a freedos bootdisk (I used an old 128MB usb stick I had lying around). On the stick, I loaded a dos program that can backup/flash the bios of your graphics card (unfortunately, I don't recall the name - but it's pretty well known).

    Once I had the usb stick working, I booted from it and backed up my bios.

    I then booted to windows (used a VM running in VirtualBox, actually) and used RBE (Radeon Bios Editor) to modify my bios settings. What I did was lower the clocks of the idle power state - you may have to modify the clocks for the second power state instead.

    Finally, I saved my modified bios to the usb stick, booted from it and flashed my card.

    My advice is to take your time and make sure you know the capabilities of your card before flashing them permanently. Test thoroughly first (if necessary, install windows and use an over-/underclocking tool like ati tray tools to discover the limits of your card). M oreover, don't use the absolute limits for your card but rather try to leave some headroom (I clocked my HD4850 100MHz higher than the absolute lowest core clock, for example).

    That's it more or less. Disclaimer: there is a very real chance that this process will brick your computer, without any way to recover. If you cannot afford to buy a new laptop, don't do this. That's all
    Bumping a bit old thread but I was travelling and hope that the knowledgeable people have subscribed the thread...

    1. RBE cannot read Mobility X1600's bios (it says this particular card's bios reading is not supported)

    2. I'm stuck before I find another utility that can since although I have two laptops I'm not that crazy that I would edit the bios blindly

    3. I'd like to know if there is someone who has already done this with the exact same card (since already X1950Pro seems to be a different story...)

    4. I do have a multiboot with Windows XP (which is still my main OS but I'm moving on to Debian Lenny whose fglrx has a working power management for my card, I just need to get some studying stuff done before having more time to install the programs I need) so I could use all tools regardless the OS they work with

    5. I can't be the only X1600 owner wanting to do this!

    Leave a comment:


  • BlackStar
    replied
    Originally posted by piete View Post
    Hi BlackStar! That's exactly what I want to do with my X1600 Mobility! What tools did you use? All the tools I have found say that they can't edit my card's bios.

    I'm fully aware of agd5f's concerns but I'm willing to take the risk, after all, my card has 3 official power states and all I want is to have PS1 as default (instead of PS2).
    Just a word of warning, modifying the bios of a mobile card is more risky than what I did. If something goes wrong, you'll have to restore the bios blind (so make sure you make a thorough list of steps and keyboard commands that restore the original bios *before* you try anything risky).

    What I did was create a freedos bootdisk (I used an old 128MB usb stick I had lying around). On the stick, I loaded a dos program that can backup/flash the bios of your graphics card (unfortunately, I don't recall the name - but it's pretty well known).

    Once I had the usb stick working, I booted from it and backed up my bios.

    I then booted to windows (used a VM running in VirtualBox, actually) and used RBE (Radeon Bios Editor) to modify my bios settings. What I did was lower the clocks of the idle power state - you may have to modify the clocks for the second power state instead.

    Finally, I saved my modified bios to the usb stick, booted from it and flashed my card.

    My advice is to take your time and make sure you know the capabilities of your card before flashing them permanently. Test thoroughly first (if necessary, install windows and use an over-/underclocking tool like ati tray tools to discover the limits of your card). M oreover, don't use the absolute limits for your card but rather try to leave some headroom (I clocked my HD4850 100MHz higher than the absolute lowest core clock, for example).

    That's it more or less. Disclaimer: there is a very real chance that this process will brick your computer, without any way to recover. If you cannot afford to buy a new laptop, don't do this. That's all

    Leave a comment:


  • Nille
    replied
    Originally posted by zhark View Post
    In Windows I have used http://www.techpowerup.com/rbe/, you need gpu-z for reading bios and winflash (or other) to flash modified bios to card. Read documentation. At your own risk.
    With atiwinflash i have killed 2 times my bios :/ but with atiflash ( the DOS/FreeDOS tool ) it work like a charm.

    Leave a comment:


  • zhark
    replied
    In Windows I have used http://www.techpowerup.com/rbe/, you need gpu-z for reading bios and winflash (or other) to flash modified bios to card. Read documentation. At your own risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • piete
    replied
    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
    That's why you backup and edit your own bios directly (instead of flashing a third party download).


    I've successfully modded a X1950Pro and an HD4850 to lower the default clock and fan speed settings. My main concern was fan noise and the bios mod worked wonders for this.
    Hi BlackStar! That's exactly what I want to do with my X1600 Mobility! What tools did you use? All the tools I have found say that they can't edit my card's bios.

    I'm fully aware of agd5f's concerns but I'm willing to take the risk, after all, my card has 3 official power states and all I want is to have PS1 as default (instead of PS2).

    Leave a comment:


  • BlackStar
    replied
    Originally posted by agd5f View Post
    Flashing your video bios is a bad idea for a number of reasons. The video bios stores information specific to that particular card. Things like:
    - connector tables (what connectors does your card have an how are they wired up)
    - laptop panel mode timings
    - board specific memory setup (not all oems use the same type, brand and speed vram; different vram chips require different setup)
    - board specific power management information (max supported clocks, safe temperature ranges, board-specific thermal and fan control chip information)
    - board specific voltage settings
    - board specific asic init routines
    - reference clocks and pll limits

    The drivers use the information in the video bios information to set up the board dependent parts of the chip. You can see the potential problems with using the wrong bios.
    That's why you backup and edit your own bios directly (instead of flashing a third party download).

    Of course, there's a real possibility that you'll screw up and brick your system and that's not fun. At least on a desktop you can boot with a PCI card and restore a backup. On a laptop you'll have to do this blind (and pray that it works).

    Moreover, I'd recommend exploring the capabilities of the GPU *thoroughly* with a modding tool before burning any permanent settings into the bios. Stuff like the lowest stable core/mem speeds for the resolutions you are using (don't forget to test multi-monitor setups, which have much higher requirements!) verified with something like furmark (yes, running furmark on the lowest power state will quickly reveal if you'll have stability problems later on). Also, don't forget to test whether dynamic switching from low->high power states work (and vice versa). Too high a jump in clockspeed will likely cause corruption.

    I've successfully modded a X1950Pro and an HD4850 to lower the default clock and fan speed settings. My main concern was fan noise and the bios mod worked wonders for this.

    Just note that this can and will brick your system if you are not careful (and sometimes even if you *are* careful), so you'll have to judge for yourself if you are willing to take the risk. If you have any concerns about bricking your system, my advice would be to avoid this. Better safe than sorry!

    Leave a comment:


  • agd5f
    replied
    Flashing your video bios is a bad idea for a number of reasons. The video bios stores information specific to that particular card. Things like:
    - connector tables (what connectors does your card have an how are they wired up)
    - laptop panel mode timings
    - board specific memory setup (not all oems use the same type, brand and speed vram; different vram chips require different setup)
    - board specific power management information (max supported clocks, safe temperature ranges, board-specific thermal and fan control chip information)
    - board specific voltage settings
    - board specific asic init routines
    - reference clocks and pll limits

    The drivers use the information in the video bios information to set up the board dependent parts of the chip. You can see the potential problems with using the wrong bios.

    Leave a comment:


  • piete
    replied
    Originally posted by WhiteRabbit View Post
    Google the site techpowerup! If you have a windows disk or windows dual boot that site has all the info and programs you need to change the fan/core clock/mem clock/ just about anything and then flash the bios... then again this is all windows based... so you need windows to do it... or maybe somebody *hint hint* could program some thing of the like for linux
    I did read Techpowerup's guide to bios flashing and Radeon Bios Editor manuals, among other things. RBE doesn't work with my card so while the guides were interesting read, I haven't been able to put them in practice. But the last time I checked was in May, when I have time, I'll have another look.

    Nanonyme, I didn't understand what you meant with vendor defaults. Couldn't they be changed? I would be more than happy if the default core/memory frequencies were the lowest possible, then I wouldn't need KMS power management (though I'm sure it is good to have when it's ready to increase performance when needed). Anyway, KMS would still be just for linux. When I want to play with FreeDOS, for example, or just use anything that defaults to "no power management" like fresh windows installation, the computer gets really hot until I install the ATI drivers.

    Leave a comment:


  • nanonyme
    replied
    Originally posted by WhiteRabbit View Post
    Google the site techpowerup! If you have a windows disk or windows dual boot that site has all the info and programs you need to change the fan/core clock/mem clock/ just about anything and then flash the bios... then again this is all windows based... so you need windows to do it... or maybe somebody *hint hint* could program some thing of the like for linux
    Unless I've understood wrong, card BIOS is just for the vendor defaults. Things should improve with KMS power management.

    Leave a comment:

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