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Open-Source "Terakan" Vulkan Driver For Radeon HD 6000 Series Shown On Windows

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  • mxan
    replied
    Originally posted by dragorth View Post
    There are lots of side effects to such a thing, for instance, could Zink run on this and offer up to date OpenGL on it? For low demanding applications, such as Older Windows Games, Emulation software, and older machines, this puts it in the running to allow things like Wayland to do basic Vulkan displays.

    However, Mesa is something that is used on more than just Linux. In fact, it is used when porting Linux GPU DRM drivers in other OSes. Things like NetBSD and FreeBSD have compatibility layers that take these drivers and allow these devices to work on their systems.
    GenodeOS does the same thing, and other projects, such as AmigaOS 4 has drivers based on this, and MorphOS are in the process of adding drivers for this class of card.
    There is no compatibility layer, Mesa runs entirely in userspace. The DRM (kernel side drivers) are mostly developed by the same people developing Mesa, but they are developed officially as part of Linux not as part of Mesa, and there are no compatibility layers there either, they are just ported straight to the BSDs.

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  • Tomin
    replied
    I wonder which kernel driver this uses.

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  • Dukenukemx
    replied
    The main benefit to having a Vulkan driver for these GPU's is not to run games like Baldur's Gate 3, but to run DX11 games which these GPU's were meant for. Not a problem on Windows and you can even install the Omega Drivers to get a more modern driver for this older GPU's. On Linux you can do DX11->OpenGL but that's not very good for performance. I'm not even sure if FP64 support was ever added to these GPU's? There are also a number of games that might benefit from Vulkan on these GPU's, like Hollow Knight. Don't forget emulators.

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  • elbar
    replied
    When you look at Windows documentation and how Windows driver should behave, some insanity would bring to MS engineers a new hint how to disrupt their further driver development because also vendors like AMD do their job to write them or prepare them for other companies and MS acknowledge them and sign them and then are downloadable not only from windows update but also from MS separate portal where they could be downloaded even from other systems from official search prompt if anybody needs such things :-).

    Simply said, such portal means that there is some docs to write such drivers but there is a lot of dll and docs simply missing when MS does not store such info to allow write competition drivers which MS can sign also and then such XML driver madness could be further distilled in MS India Enterprise when Balmer is out and Paul Allen is dead and MS is without proper Western Civilization captain but also some from such civilization on board and wild sea is cruel like some MS signed Vulkan drivers on Windows :-)

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  • rene
    replied
    Originally posted by dragorth View Post

    You are making the assumption that the current drivers will continue to work, which isn't a good assumption to make, really.

    I have recently been watching a coder on Twitch who has been working on his T2SDE distro that still supports Itanium and Alpha and lots of other platforms, and the biggest takeaway I have from someone actually maintaining a distro is upstream is constantly breaking older hardware, because it isn't tested, it is just assumed it works.

    Getting everything onto one common code path can help with that to some extent, but the reality is, the kernel devs are always chasing the new shiny. I appreciate it, but I also can't use the latest version of software on my Power Mac G4 MDD anymore, because the drivers and software are not up to snuff.

    When you have 100 times or more people making changes to upstream, the people maintaining older hardware really can't keep up.

    And frankly, I want older hardware to be usable. It is easier to hack on it, it is easier to learn how to design parts for it, it is easier to boot from it.
    oh, yeah, this guy, I think I watched him, too ;-) https://www.twitch.tv/rxrbln/clip/Ge...lXWf14iWl6TH8Y - this https://t2sde.org is also pretty cool, run on all my collection of vintage & retro hw, too, ... ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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  • rene
    replied
    certainly shows how inefficient and lazy big mega cooperations are, ...

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  • dragorth
    replied
    Originally posted by NateHubbard View Post

    Right, what I mean though is that those cards already supported OpenGL 4.5 anyway. Maybe you'd find something that requires 4.6, but isn't a modern game or something, but it just doesn't seem likely to me.
    I suppose a compositor running vulkan makes the most sense.
    You are making the assumption that the current drivers will continue to work, which isn't a good assumption to make, really.

    I have recently been watching a coder on Twitch who has been working on his T2SDE distro that still supports Itanium and Alpha and lots of other platforms, and the biggest takeaway I have from someone actually maintaining a distro is upstream is constantly breaking older hardware, because it isn't tested, it is just assumed it works.

    Getting everything onto one common code path can help with that to some extent, but the reality is, the kernel devs are always chasing the new shiny. I appreciate it, but I also can't use the latest version of software on my Power Mac G4 MDD anymore, because the drivers and software are not up to snuff.

    When you have 100 times or more people making changes to upstream, the people maintaining older hardware really can't keep up.

    And frankly, I want older hardware to be usable. It is easier to hack on it, it is easier to learn how to design parts for it, it is easier to boot from it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daktyl198
    replied
    I really wish that some effort was made to properly port Mesa drivers to Windows. Specifically AMD drivers. I know Mesa's architecture allows for it to run on Windows, but nobody is bug testing and producing prebuilt installers for them.

    Leave a comment:


  • NateHubbard
    replied
    Originally posted by dragorth View Post

    I gave the simplest example of window managers already, do you want more?
    Right, what I mean though is that those cards already supported OpenGL 4.5 anyway. Maybe you'd find something that requires 4.6, but isn't a modern game or something, but it just doesn't seem likely to me.
    I suppose a compositor running vulkan makes the most sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Developer12
    replied
    So many people seem to have caught michael's terminal benchmarker-brain syndrome.

    Vulkan is rapidly becoming the *only* graphics API used on linux. Not just for high-spec games but for everything from window managers to gui toolkits and from there to regular old productivity tools, misc config menus, and random stuff like that. SDL is used for a lot of random boring apps, not just games. What happens if/when they deprecate openGL entirely? That's totally on the table for the next 5-10 years.

    Most of the stuff the average user runs on a linux desktop is perfectly capable of being run with *software rendering* if push comes to shove, but when more and more stuff is deprecating the openGL backend a vulkan implementation becomes mandatory. At that point anyone with this older hardware has to choose between this GPU-accelerated vulkan solution and the vulkan equivalent of LLVM-pipe. Clearly, having an implementation of vulkan with at least *basic* GPU acceleration is preferable.

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