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Upgrading Ubuntu 22.04's Kernel & Mesa For Better AMD RDNA2 Performance

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  • sweetsuicide
    replied
    Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

    - Yes, Michael actually meant the OEM kernel but incorrectly wrote HWE.

    - Don't use the OIBAF PPA if you prefer stability. Use this one instead by Kisak from Valve which provides the latest stable MESA version:

    https://launchpad.net/~kisak/+archive/ubuntu/kisak-mesa

    - When uprading, always use the following to avoid & solve your problem of kept back packages:
    Code:
    sudo apt full-upgrade
    Hope I could be of help!
    You have been exceedingly helpful, thank you very much!

    Leave a comment:


  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by sweetsuicide View Post
    Hi,
    I have a brand new Ubuntu 22.04 with a brand new RDNA2 graphics card. I am extremey sorry as I understand that this isn't the correct place for this.
    I am having trouble following the instructions:
    - Linux 5.17 is available as an HWE kernel on Ubuntu 22.04 . Tried it. It says I'm fine on 5.15. Is it the OEM variant? Because that doesn't sound like hwe to me
    - OIBAF ppa. I already tried on an older laptop I have here, where I wanted to test galliumnine, but I always have the following issue:

    The following NEW packages will be installed:
    libllvm14 libllvm14:i386
    The following packages have been kept back:
    libegl-mesa0 libegl-mesa0:i386 libgbm1 libgbm1:i386 libgl1-mesa-dri
    libgl1-mesa-dri:i386 libglapi-mesa libglapi-mesa:i386 libglx-mesa0
    libglx-mesa0:i386
    The following packages will be upgraded:
    libdrm-amdgpu1 libdrm-amdgpu1:i386 libdrm-common libdrm-intel1
    libdrm-intel1:i386 libdrm-nouveau2 libdrm-nouveau2:i386 libdrm-radeon1
    libdrm-radeon1:i386 libdrm2 libdrm2:i386 libvdpau1 libxatracker2
    mesa-va-drivers mesa-va-drivers:i386 mesa-vdpau-drivers mesa-vulkan-drivers
    mesa-vulkan-drivers:i386 vdpau-driver-all

    THE KEPT BACK PACKAGES will fuck up the whole stack. Only solution I found is remove and reinstall the whole GNOME STACK. Can someone help me out with this? How did you manage to install the packages without breaking everything?

    Thank you
    - Yes, Michael actually meant the OEM kernel but incorrectly wrote HWE.

    - Don't use the OIBAF PPA if you prefer stability. Use this one instead by Kisak from Valve which provides the latest stable MESA version:

    https://launchpad.net/~kisak/+archive/ubuntu/kisak-mesa

    - When uprading, always use the following to avoid & solve your problem of kept back packages:
    Code:
    sudo apt full-upgrade
    Hope I could be of help!

    Leave a comment:


  • luno
    replied
    Originally posted by ping-wu View Post
    Debian Unstable ("Sid") actually is a very good rolling Linux release. Although it is labeled with a misnomer "unstable", because its package versions often are more up-to-date (thus the label "unstable"), it is sometimes more stable than the "stable" version, which usually does not allow version upgrade. For example, I need to regularly use ibus-libpinyin for inputting Chinese characters, and Debian Sid/Bookworm is more stable than Bullseye at least in this regard.

    Of course you need to be a reasonably experienced Linux user to use Debian Sid, but I believe most of us in this forum are well beyond this level.
    this is actually so true, I had more luck running Debian Unstable than running Arch Linux / Fedora as many high profile company run unstable to test their supply chain. it is one of the most tested distro.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azpegath
    replied
    MichaelWhy did you run Superposition at lowest quality? Running it at Ultra might actually tax the hardware at a relevant level.

    Leave a comment:


  • sweetsuicide
    replied
    Hi,
    I have a brand new Ubuntu 22.04 with a brand new RDNA2 graphics card. I am extremey sorry as I understand that this isn't the correct place for this.
    I am having trouble following the instructions:
    - Linux 5.17 is available as an HWE kernel on Ubuntu 22.04 . Tried it. It says I'm fine on 5.15. Is it the OEM variant? Because that doesn't sound like hwe to me
    - OIBAF ppa. I already tried on an older laptop I have here, where I wanted to test galliumnine, but I always have the following issue:

    The following NEW packages will be installed:
    libllvm14 libllvm14:i386
    The following packages have been kept back:
    libegl-mesa0 libegl-mesa0:i386 libgbm1 libgbm1:i386 libgl1-mesa-dri
    libgl1-mesa-dri:i386 libglapi-mesa libglapi-mesa:i386 libglx-mesa0
    libglx-mesa0:i386
    The following packages will be upgraded:
    libdrm-amdgpu1 libdrm-amdgpu1:i386 libdrm-common libdrm-intel1
    libdrm-intel1:i386 libdrm-nouveau2 libdrm-nouveau2:i386 libdrm-radeon1
    libdrm-radeon1:i386 libdrm2 libdrm2:i386 libvdpau1 libxatracker2
    mesa-va-drivers mesa-va-drivers:i386 mesa-vdpau-drivers mesa-vulkan-drivers
    mesa-vulkan-drivers:i386 vdpau-driver-all

    THE KEPT BACK PACKAGES will fuck up the whole stack. Only solution I found is remove and reinstall the whole GNOME STACK. Can someone help me out with this? How did you manage to install the packages without breaking everything?

    Thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • nist
    replied
    In my opinion, the test Linux 5.17 - Mesa 22.0.1 is important to evaluate better the whole benchmark.

    Leave a comment:


  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    That's a systemd-oomd bug and effects Fedora and other distributions; not just Ubuntu. And it really isn't a bug; just a cruddy default.

    Copy/pasted from Fedora

    Code:
    systemctl edit [email protected]
    [Service]
    ManagedOOMMemoryPressure=kill
    ManagedOOMMemoryPressureLimit=10%
    You could try changing 10% to 1%. Let yourself actually be OOM before OOMD kicks in.

    IMHO, 10% isn't OOM. That's 3.2GB free on my system. Because I totally want Firefox killed off when I still have 3.2 gigs of ram
    At least Ubuntu/Canonical really does test things prior to release, unlike Fedora/RedHat:

    This is greatly exasperated because systemd until v251 is using MemFree and not MemAvailable to decide how much memory is remaining. Since Linux aggressively uses MemFree for caching, this will result in systemd-oomd excessively killing applications.

    There's a fix in upstream 030bc91cb98385904b28a839d1e04bb4160a52d2, which was released as v251 about a week ago.
    Response from a Canonical developer:

    We cherrypicked that patch in 22.04 before release

    https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source...49.11-0ubuntu3
    PS:
    Really hope Your Mom gets well, soon.
    Take good care of Her!

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by hax0r View Post
    Wonder what regression in Linux 5.18 Git is making things slower for RDNA2 compared to 5.17
    Serious Not Serious -- Ask Michael in a few more days

    Leave a comment:


  • hax0r
    replied
    Wonder what regression in Linux 5.18 Git is making things slower for RDNA2 compared to 5.17

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post
    Not doing serious work on gnome? Gnome is the only wm where I can effectively use multi monitors with multiple workspaces in a quick manner. And than autotiling from system76 is pushing you into a perfect flow state
    In all fairness, on my 55" TV I can't get serious work done on GNOME. That's a lot of screen real-estate wasted by how GNOME does things and, to me, it's a real pain in the butt multitasking around GNOME when compared to other environments. If all I had open was a single window, sure. The second I'm dipping between an editor, terminal, calculator, browser, another editor, a music player, and another browser I get frustrated.

    Yes, I sometimes run two web browsers at a time. Only MS Edge saves video progress on a couple of streaming sites I frequent.
    Last edited by skeevy420; 01 June 2022, 03:41 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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