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AMD Releases R600/700 Programming Guide

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  • ap90033
    replied
    Well considering the current lack of games in linux couldnt you live with a little bit of waste for us gamers? Besides you dont have to have the extra libraries. So how about you dont have them, I will and I will waste an extra gig of memory, I dont care but I do care to be able to play my games LOL.... That way we all win...

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  • duby229
    replied
    Originally posted by ap90033 View Post
    Got 6 gig and can get 12 for it... Not a big deal again. I am not saying become bloated like windows but sheesh we have hardware now that should be taken advantage of... lol
    taken advantage of and wasted are 2 very different things. I run some pretty heavy terminal servers that get alot of traffic. I use nx to share desktops to many different thin clients. In this configuration all of the processing and memory is on the server. Imagine running every version of every lib loaded into main memory for every single session..... We absolutely must keep it thin. Ok, so maybe you wont have every single version loaded into memory, but you may well have 2 or three versions loaded for some libs. If everything used the same versions then we would only need 1 version of each lib.

    Running a Windows terminal server on 2008 server I can at most about 40 active sessions on my best server and that is pushing it a bit.. Using Linux with nx I can have around 150 active sessions and still run each well.

    Thats a testament right there
    Last edited by duby229; 07-12-2009, 11:35 PM.

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  • ap90033
    replied
    Got 6 gig and can get 12 for it... Not a big deal again. I am not saying become bloated like windows but sheesh we have hardware now that should be taken advantage of... lol

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  • monraaf
    replied
    Originally posted by ap90033 View Post
    Dude who cares about having to keep an extra library? I have (2) 750 Gig drives so space is not a concern as it isnt for most. Drives a cheap.
    Well, extra libraries will also be eating up extra memory.

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  • ap90033
    replied
    Dude who cares about having to keep an extra library? I have (2) 750 Gig drives so space is not a concern as it isnt for most. Drives a cheap.

    I am trying to do what i can. Its like the political arena in America, both parties suck and want you to feel that you have no chance in changing the crappy politicians minds. BUT if Everyone would quit fighting about Democrat versus Republican and we all agreed on the core principals this country was founded we would be united (they dont want that) and could make a difference. I mean isnt it funny that both parties claim they wont raise taxes then when elected thats the first thing they do.

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  • Ex-Cyber
    replied
    Originally posted by madman2k View Post
    personally I dont think it is a good idea to release closed source games for linux at all.
    I mean in linux everything assumes everything else is open source so they break ABI/ API quite often and it is a pain in the ass to keep an ancient version of libstdc++ or sdl just to play a commercial game.
    Actually, the way it works on Windows is precisely that the needed versions of libraries are kept around, usually installed inside the application's directory. For example, I have a Sun JDK installation with 3 copies of msvcr71.dll (the libc DLL from Visual C++ .NET 2003).
    Last edited by Ex-Cyber; 07-12-2009, 07:12 PM.

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  • madman2k
    replied
    personally I dont think it is a good idea to release closed source games for linux at all.
    I mean in linux everything assumes everything else is open source so they break ABI/ API quite often and it is a pain in the ass to keep an ancient version of libstdc++ or sdl just to play a commercial game.

    I would rather prefer if developers would ensure that everything works under wine so it would be our "compability layer".

    The alternative would be to release the engine as OSS and keep the content proproetary...

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  • Kjella
    replied
    Originally posted by nhaehnle View Post
    But yeah, the irony is that big studios won't port their games to Linux because, even though they could easily afford to do it, the added income from Linux just doesn't register for them.

    On the other hand, look for independent studios producing Linux games - while the relative cost of supporting Linux is higher for them, they stand to gain much more. And there are certainly some gems out there; just vote with your money.
    I don't think you should forget that those big name titles are pretty much 100% made without thinking about cross-platform compatibility. Often they are designed for a DirectX engine, that's often licensed not owned by them. If the cost estimates include doing that from scratch with all the ugly details of making something work exactly like this other engine works then the cost/benefit obviously won't work out.

    The independents on the other hand often prefer to use open engines or other cross-platform languages. A good example is "World of Goo", that's a pretty big hit that's available for Linux. Other than that, I must admit most of my gaming happens in WINE...

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  • nhaehnle
    replied
    I recall an article by the head of an indie game studio, where he was basically saying that they make significant money (for their small size) from Mac OSX and Linux markets. In particular, while the market on those alternative OSs is significantly smaller than on Windows, it is also much easier to get very good exposure in those markets, precisely because there are so few people catering to them. Unfortunately, this is now just me talking, because I can't find the link anymore...

    But yeah, the irony is that big studios won't port their games to Linux because, even though they could easily afford to do it, the added income from Linux just doesn't register for them.

    On the other hand, look for independent studios producing Linux games - while the relative cost of supporting Linux is higher for them, they stand to gain much more. And there are certainly some gems out there; just vote with your money.

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  • nanonyme
    replied
    Originally posted by Kano View Post
    Create an online game then you see it in the server stats
    That's details. My point was that you need a proof of concept, things will probably start rolling on their own weight after that. This is why learning to code and to draw is a lot more important than buying hardware.

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